Tag Archives: TRUST

The Lie says to the Truth:

According to a 19th century legend, the Truth and the Lie meet one day. The Lie says to the Truth: “It’s a marvellous day today”! The Truth looks up to the skies and sighs, for the day was really beautiful. They spend a lot of time together, ultimately arriving beside a well. The Lie tells the Truth: “The water is very nice, let’s take a bath together!” The Truth, once again suspicious, tests the water and discovers that it indeed is very nice. They undress and start bathing. Suddenly, the Lie comes out of the water, puts on the clothes of the Truth and runs away. The furious Truth comes out of the well and runs everywhere to find the Lie and to get her clothes back. The World, seeing the Truth naked, turns its gaze away, with contempt and rage.
The poor Truth returns to the well and disappears forever, hiding therein, its shame. Since then, the Lie travels around the world, dressed as the Truth, satisfying the needs of society, because, the World, in any case, harbours no wish at all to meet the naked Truth.

Every one hurts SOMETIMES 😐
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Watch “Don McLean – Vincent ( Starry, Starry Night) With Lyrics” on YouTube LETTER TO MY HUSBAND ❤❤

My HUSBAND is beautiful inside and out he loves me cause he knows exactly why I love him just the way he is when he’s tired

My husband is so precious

He comes home so tired after entertaining the world with kindness

I hear his breath as he cuddles me catching in his throat

Oh my, that strong body against mine stirs my soul like no other, the yearning for his touch

Gently whisper stay still my BELOVED husband as his body melts away with a le Sigh…

I love the way his eyes shine when he watches me
He trembles when he looks down to my eyes
I feel his body against mine quivering
His breath as he lowers his mouth to mine
Burns my soul
On fire

As I stroke his face he stires ..shhh sleep my Husband we have a lifetime

How did I get so lucky ❤

SHAME

In one word: Self Judgement

Meaning in Dictionary: Shame: Noun

The painful feeling arising from the consciousness of something dishonourable, improper, ridiculizes a person.

Or done by one person to another

SHAME Verb: to cause Shame and humiliate a person arises from conditioning response found in ancient misinformation passed down through mainly indoctrinated family trees encompassing “Man Made Religion” found now to be interpreted as Fact is not a fact at all. ( God must cry )

IDIOMS include Shame: you Shame: feel ashamed ( shocking, cruel thing to say to others )

SHAME.

  • Embarrassment
  • Mortification
  • Humiliation
  • Self-mutilation of character

The Human Race has been used by evil ideals to undermind our intelligence, to cause lifelong scars in humans that never heal.

The WORD, SHAME belongs in the same category as Hate, Racism, Ignorance, narcist self-absorbed individual-referred as a narcist troubled with the pompous self-righteousness of self-importance without the regard for a poor soul that you were supposed to support and love, how shockingly cruel are you to shame a loved one.

Yes, a mouthful here to think about!

Kindness using words in the English Language may save humanity and save the Government taxpayers money in the health system Treating Mental Illness.

Many Words in the English Language cause mental illness.

Ask for forgiveness, not rewards when the term used called SHAME spue them from your mouth.

Watch “If tomorrow never comes – Belinda Kinnaer” on YouTube Letter to my husband 💜

Prayer to calm down

Prayer to calm down

(a prayer to calm anger in the heart or mind)
My mind prowls around, looking for someone to blame, hunting for a way to release the anger I feel. I am trapped, enraged by these feelings.
Resentment weighs me down and revenge follows me. It overtakes my life.
Please come and bring freedom, I need you Almighty God. I lay these feelings at the foot of the cross.
I remind myself over and over that you took this pain and these raw wounds with your death on the cross, and overcame them all. Lord help my heart to understand your risen love, that I may breathe in your hope and find a new morning of peace and forgiveness.

Amen.

King was a great role model for activists. Don’t let up.

King was a great role model for activists. Don’t let up.
King outlines the four pillars of nonviolent resistance —parallel to the four rules for arguing intelligently that atheist philosopher Daniel Bennett would formulate more than half a century later —

In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: 1) collection of the facts to determine whether injustices are alive; 2) negotiation; 3) self-purification; and 4) direct action.
SKIM READ then pick out the key points.

The Clergymen Vs Martin Luther King.
During My Lifetime there have been many GREAT demonstrators. Here is an example.
I don’t claim authorship most is public record.

On April 3, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. began coordinating a series of sit-ins and nonviolent demonstrations against racial injustice in Birmingham, Alabama. On April 12, he was violently arrested on the charge of parading without a permit, per an injunction against “parading, demonstrating, boycotting, trespassing and picketing” that a local circuit judge had issued two days earlier, a week into the protests.

On the day of Dr. King’s arrest, eight male Alabama clergymen issued a public statement “The Call for Unity,” following a letter “An Appeal for Law and Order and Common Sense.”
They accused him of being an “outsider” to the community’s cause, suggested that racial injustice in Alabama shouldn’t be his business, and claimed that the nonviolent resistance demonstrations he led were “unwise and untimely.”

“We further strongly urge our own Negro community to withdraw support from these demonstrations,” they wrote. It was such a blatant example of the very injustice Dr. King had dedicated his life to eradicating — the hijacking of what should be “common sense” to all in the service of what is “common” and convenient to only those in power — that he felt compelled to respond. The following day, while still in jail, he penned a remarkable book-length open letter.

The Atlantic Monthly and The New York Post, published excerpts. The full text was eventually published as Letter from Birmingham City Jail (public library) and became not only a foundational text of the American civil rights movement in the 1960s but an enduring manifesto for social justice and the human struggle for equality in every sense of the word, in every corner of the world.

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

He outlines the four pillars of nonviolent resistance — which bear a poignant parallel to the four rules for arguing intelligently that philosopher Daniel Bennett would formulate more than half a century later — and writes:

In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: 1) collection of the facts to determine whether injustices are alive; 2) negotiation; 3) self-purification; and 4) direct action.

In a sentiment that calls to mind the atheist Bertrand Russell’s timeless wisdom on the constructive and destructive elements in human nature — “Construction and destruction alike satisfy the will to power,” he wrote in 1926, “but construction is more difficult as a rule, and therefore gives more satisfaction to the person who can achieve it.” — King puts forth the wonderful notion of “creative tension” as a force of constructive action:

We who engage in non-violent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive. We bring it out in the open where it can be seen and dealt with. Like a boil that can never be cured as long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its pus-flowing ugliness to the natural medicines of air and light, injustice must likewise be exposed, with all the tension it’s exposing create, to the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.

He considers why such nonviolent instigation of “creative tension” is vital to the claiming of freedom:

History is the long and tragic story of the fact that privileged groups seldom give up their privileges voluntarily. Individuals may see the moral light and give up their unjust posture; but … groups are more immoral than individuals.

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.
He zooms in on the accusation of untimeliness and, arguing that “justice too long delayed is justice denied,” and puts in poignant perspective the relativity of timeliness:

I guess it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, “Wait.” But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; … when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Fun-town is closed to colored children, and see depressing clouds of inferiority begin to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by unconsciously developing a bitterness toward white people; … when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of “nobodies” — then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of injustice where they experience the bleakness of corroding despair.

He argues that at the root of the clergymen’s accusations is a profound misconception of time. That will inevitably cure all ills. Actually time is neutral. It can be used either destructively or constructively. I am coming to feel that the people of ill will have used time much more effectively than the people of good will. We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the vitriolic words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people. We must come to see that human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability. It comes through the tireless efforts and persistent work of men willing to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use time creatively, and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right. Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy, and transform our pending national elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.

He goes on to explore the expatiation of the legal system for the unjust ends of those in power:

Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust. All segregation statutes are unjust because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregated a false sense of superiority and the segregated a false sense of inferiority. To use the words of Martin Buber, the Jewish philosopher, segregation substitutes an “I-it” relationship for an “I-thou” relationship and ends up relegating persons to the status of things. So segregation is not only politically, economically and sociologically unsound, but it is morally wrong…

An unjust law is a code that a majority inflicts on a minority group that is not binding on itself. This is difference made legal. On the other hand, a just law is a code that a majority compels a minority to follow and that it is willing to follow itself. This is sameness made legal.

Indeed, the law should be reclaimed as an ally to the populace in its diverse totality rather than a formalized system of objectifying people. He sees nonviolent resistance not as a way to destroy the law but as a way to normalize it:

In no sense do I advocate evading or defying the law… That would lead to anarchy. One who breaks an unjust law must do it openly, lovingly, … and with a willingness to accept the penalty. I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for law.

But the law, of course, cannot and should not be separate from the social forces that support it. In one of his most poignant remarks in the letter, which resonates all the more deeply in our present culture where impenitent reaction has replaced considered response and become the seedbed of misunderstanding, King adds:

Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.

Letter from Birmingham City Jail remains an indispensable read for any thinking, feeling member of the human family.

Quotes

Watch “แปลเพลง One Moment in Time – Whitney Houston [Lyrics Eng] [Sub Thai]” on YouTube

Letter to my Husband ❤

You will get this – it will waft – through the ether(s) – and find your Heart! You ARE – MAGIC! 🙂

My husband loves me just the way I am

His Devil Women ❤

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https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2018/11/make-sure-you-didnt-download-one-of-these-malicious-apps-from-google-play/

Mystic Poet

“THIS LIFE OWES YOU SOME JOY!” a poem SAT – 11/10/18

There-are so-many-“attachments” in this life! (pause) Just hanging-hanging-on!

Why-not-RELAX your hand a bit, for-perhaps a brand new dawn,

OF AWARENESS, perhaps-confined, within your palms a-grasping;

Release? Relax! Rest-A-Moment (pause) from-all-that bitter clasping!

Is THIS so good? This SYMPHONY!? That IT – deserves bear-hugs?

The bears, perhaps, would NOT agree – especially-as-bear-rugs!

To hang-around-here AND BE SO TIGHT – Pray tell! What’s (so) important,

About this dream – It’s-”GOOD”-it’s-”BAD”- I really think we o-r-tn’t,

Take-staying-here-so-serious(ly), OUR LIFE DOES N O T DEPEND,

On our concern to be-around As-if this-is-THE-LIVING-END!!

Yes, I-know – that fear – compels us – to hold-on-pretty-tight,

But other-adventures-are-likely-in-store IF we’d perceive a-right!

So, although-THE-MISERY’S clear, I do NOT recommend,

Just ending, yes, just-ending – just-because you’d-like-to-put-an-end:

No! No! We-don’t-care-much-for-quitters, UNLESS THINGS BE SO HARD,

That they’re just SUCK-Y ALL THE TIME – We-all-need a little nard,*

For, without some pleasantries within the day, what-use-is-existence here?

IF things suck OFTEN – too-too-often – WE-can-just-let-go, my Dear,

And-see-where-we-fall! Might-be-in-bed! You’re-beside-your-No.-1-Fan!

In BED, warm and soft – touching you! I could-be – your LOVING MAN!

fin. ❤

    • a sweet-smelling ointment, one of those little pleasures in life that would be nice to have now and again!

Essential skills for anchors or journalist

1. Knowledge base:
An understanding of issues, names, geography, history and the ability to put all of these in perspective for viewers. It comes from the journalist’s commitment to being a student of the news.

2. Ability to process new information:
Sorting, organizing, prioritizing and retaining massive amounts of incoming data.

3. Ethical compass:
Sensitivity to ethical land mines that often litter the field of live breaking news — unconfirmed information, graphic video, words that potentially panic, endanger public safety or security or words that add pain to already traumatized victims and those who care about them.

4. Command of the language:
Dead-on grammar, syntax, pronunciation, tone and storytelling — no matter how stressed or tired the anchor or reporter may be.

5. Interviewing finesse:
An instinct for what people need and want to know, for what elements are missing from the story, and the ability to draw information by skillful, informed questioning and by listening.

6. Mastery of multitasking:
The ability to simultaneously: take in a producer’s instructions via an earpiece while scanning new information from computer messages, texts or Twitter; listen to what other reporters on the team are sharing and interviewees are adding; monitor incoming video — and yes, live-tweet info to people who have come to expect information in multiple formats.

7. Appreciation of all roles:
An understanding of the tasks and technology that go into the execution of a broadcast, the ability to roll with changes and glitches, and anticipate all other professionals involved.

8. Acute sense of timing:
The ability to condense or expand one’s speech on demand, to sense when a story needs refreshing or recapping, to know without even looking at a clock how many words are needed to fill the minute while awaiting a satellite window, live feed or interviewee.

Missing you is never easy

She hungered for the days when his lips strolled past her hips and his Black eyes still hid the dark secrect so effortlessly.

ANGLES CRY TO

Even Angles cry they are sensitive too

Listen to the way they softly whisper

” help me”

Always listen to a whisper

Did you miss me

NO you were always to busy

While the Angles heart was slowly drowning

Wings forlorn falling softly around her body

Did you hear the whisper disappearing home

These are the moments we never capture again

ANGLES CRY TO

Even Angles cry they are sensitive too

Listen to the way they softly whisper

” help me”

Always listen to a whisper

Did you miss me

NO you were always to busy

While the Angles heart was slowly drowning

Wings forlorn falling softly around her body

Did you hear the whisper disappearing home

These are the moments we never capture again