Tag Archives: Scammers alert

The photos used by man ‘posing as US soldier to scam online lover’ – 7 News . We posted this to Facebook as a Warning. Truly this beggars belief how stupid men or women on social media are. ๐Ÿ’ฃ This week we saw a Male Freind exposed on Facebook with a Woman who snapped him masterbating for her ( happened to be male scam) His wife is furious. Facebook missed it. I “overshare” Landscapes, Flowers and animals and receive 28 days Blocked ๐Ÿ’ฃ๐Ÿ™ˆ๐Ÿ™Š๐Ÿ™‰

The photos used by man ‘posing as US soldier to scam online lover’ – 7 News

https://yns.page.link/NRCW7

Advertisements

Second Chapter of the SCAM LETTER 1/1/2019 ( plus a very sexy photograph, not shown ๐Ÿ˜‚)

My Dear ,

I need your help to stand as my trustee for transferring the money to your Bank account for investment project. As I told you in my earlier mail, I am staying in the mission in Burkina Faso and I haven’t a personal telephone to be reached but if you wish to hear my voice, you can reach me through the office telephone number of the Mission co-ordinator. His name is Father Anthony and his office telephone number is +22667683203. If you call tell him that you want to speak with Miss Elodine Warlord Ibrahim Coulibaly am staying in Block G14 female hostel.

The reason while I ask you to contact the bank as my trustee is because I have contacted the bank on my arrival to clear the money but the branch manager of the bank whom I met in person told me that my status as a refugee does not authorize me to transfer the money. He advised me to seek for some one who will represent me and transfer the money into his or her bank account. I wanted to inform my stepmother about this deposit but am afraid that she will not release the money to me after clearing the money because after the death of my parent she and my uncle arrange secretly and sold my father’s estate in Songon-Agban.

They shared the money among themselves and when I confronted them my uncle told me that the tradition and custom of our land does not entitle me to share assets of my father as a single young girl. Ever then they have been maltreating me and even made arrangement to assassinate me because of the demand for my share of the money from the sales of the estate. I want you to help me because you are God sent and you will never regret for helping me ,
Please send me your full contact information which include:

Your full name:
Contact address:
Telephone numbers to be reached:
Your age:
Your Occupation:
Marital Status:
Your Nationality
Your photos to see you:

Information above is very important for me to know you well so as to proceed further with trust. As soon as I receive them I will give you the contact of the bank were my father deposited the money. And you will contact the bank as my trustee and ask them to transfer the money into your bank account for investment project. After you receive the money in your bank account you will send some amount to me to process my traveling documents which I will use to come and settle in your country and further my academic studies while you will invest the money.

Thanks a lot in anticipation of your quick reply .attached is my photo

Best regards
Miss Elodine Warlod I Coulibaly

Scam Email arrived today. ๐Ÿ˜‚

Dearest,

I know this mail will come to you as a surprise since we haven’t known or come across each other before considering the fact that I sourced your email contact through the Internet in search of trusted person who can assist me.

I am Miss Elodine Warlord Ibrahim Coulibaly 24 years old female from the Republic of Ivory Coast,West Africa ,am the Daughter of Late Chief Sgt.Warlord Ibrahim Coulibaly (a.k.a General IB ). My late father was a well known Ivory Coast militia leader . He died on Thursday 28 April 2011 following a fight with the Republican Forces of Ivory Coast(FRCI). I am constrained to contact you because of the maltreatment which I am receiving from my step mother.

She planned to take away all my late father’s treasury and properties from me since the unexpected death of my beloved Father. Meanwhile I wanted to travel to Europe, but she hide away my international passport and other valuable documents. Luckily she did not discover where I kept my father’s File which contained important documents. Now I am presently staying in the Mission in Burkina Faso.

I am seeking for long term relationship and investment assistance. My father of blessed memory deposited the sum of US$ 27.5 Million in one bank in Burkina Faso with my name as the next of kin. I had contacted the Bank to clear the deposit but the Branch Manager told me that being a refugee, my status according to the local law does not authorize me to carry out the operation. However, he advised me to provide a trustee who will stand on my behalf. I had wanted to inform my stepmother about this deposit but I am afraid that she will not offer me anything after the release of the money.

Therefore, I decide to seek for your help in transferring the money into your bank account while I will relocate to your country and settle down with you. As you indicated your interest to help me I will give you the account number and the contact of the bank where my late beloved father deposited the money with my name as the next of kin. It is my intention to compensate you with 40% of the total money for your assistance and the balance shall be my investment in any profitable venture which you will recommend to me as have no any idea about foreign investment. Please all communications should be through this email address for confidential purposes.(elodinecoulibaly5@gmail.com)

Thanking you a lot in anticipation of your quick response. I will give you details in my next mail after receiving your acceptance mail to help me ,

Yours sincerely
Miss Elodine Warlord Ibrahim Coulibaly
(elodinecoulibaly5@gmail.com)

SCAM WATCH GO TO – TYPE INTO BROWERS – AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DAILY UPDATES


Protect yourself from scams
Scammers are getting increasingly sophisticated in their attempts to get your money or personal details. Be alert and protect yourself from being scammed by following our tips.

Scams target everyone
Protect yourself
How to spot a fake
Follow up scams
More information
Scams target everyone
Scams target people of all backgrounds, ages and income levels across Australia. There’s no one group of people who are more likely to become a victim of a scam, all of us may be vulnerable to a scam at some time.

Scams succeed because they look like the real thing and catch you off guard when youโ€™re not expecting it. Scammers are getting smarter and taking advantage of new technology, new products or services and major events to create believable stories that will convince you to give them your money or personal details.

Protect yourself
Be alert to the fact that scams exist. When dealing with uninvited contacts from people or businesses, whether it’s over the phone, by mail, email, in person or on a social networking site, always consider the possibility that the approach may be a scam. Remember, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is.
Know who you’re dealing with. If you’ve only ever met someone online or are unsure of the legitimacy of a business, take some time to do a bit more research. Do a Google image search on photos or search the internet for others who may have had dealings with them. If a message or email comes from a friend and it seems unusual or out of character for them, contact your friend directly to check that it was really them that sent it.
Do not open suspicious texts, pop-up windows or click on links or attachments in emails โ€“ delete them: If unsure, verify the identity of the contact through an independent source such as a phone book or online search. Don’t use the contact details provided in the message sent to you.
Don’t respond to phone calls about your computer asking for remote access โ€“ hang up โ€“ even if they mention a well-known company such as Telstra. Scammers will often ask you to turn on your computer to fix a problem or install a free upgrade, which is actually a virus which will give them your passwords and personal details.
Keep your personal details secure. Put a lock on your mailbox and shred your bills and other important documents before throwing them out. Keep your passwords and pin numbers in a safe place. Be very careful about how much personal information you share on social media sites. Scammers can use your information and pictures to create a fake identity or to target you with a scam.
Keep your mobile devices and computers secure. Always use password protection, donโ€™t share access with others (including remotely), update security software and back up content. Protect your WiFi network with a password and avoid using public computers or WiFi hotspots to access online banking or provide personal information.
Choose your passwords carefully. Choose passwords that would be difficult for others to guess and update them regularly. A strong password should include a mix of upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols. Donโ€™t use the same password for every account/profile, and donโ€™t share your passwords with anyone.
Review your privacy and security settings on social media. If you use social networking sites, such as Facebook, be careful who you connect with and learn how to use your privacy and security settings to ensure you stay safe. If you recognise suspicious behaviour, clicked on spam or have been scammed online, take steps to secure your account and be sure to report it.

Beware of any requests for your details or money. Never send money or give credit card details, online account details or copies of personal documents to anyone you donโ€™t know or trust. Don’t agree to transfer money or goods for someone else: money laundering is a criminal offence.

Be wary of unusual payment requests. Scammers will often ask you to use an unusual payment method, including preloaded debit cards, gift cards, iTunes cards or virtual currency such as Bitcoin.

Be careful when shopping online. Beware of offers that seem too good to be true, and always use an online shopping service that you know and trust. Think twice before using virtual currencies (like Bitcoin) – they do not have the same protections as other transaction methods, which means you canโ€™t get your money back once you send it. Learn more about online shopping scams.

How to spot a fake
Clues for spotting a fake document

Clues for spotting fake documents

Documents are easily faked. Some will look just like the real thing but others might have warning signs, such as:

generic rather than personal greeting
names of organisations that don’t exist
poorer quality presentation
poorer quality grammar and spelling
overly official or forced language.
Documents such as flight itineraries and bank statements have simple, uncomplicated layouts even when they are legitimate because such businesses allow their customers to print online statements. This means that scammers can easily create fake documents by using information available online such as company logos and graphics from websites.

Clues for spotting a fake email

Clues for spotting a fake email

Scammers can easily fake an official-looking email, using the same logo and design as the real company.

Often your guard is down when you receive an email from a company you’ve dealt with before, such as Australia Post or an online shopping site you use. If you’re not expecting an email, always be alert to a fake before clicking on any links or opening any attachments.

Clues for spotting a fake dating profile
When looking at a new dating profile, note anything unusual about their choice of:

Clues for spotting fake profiles

photo
location
interests
language skills matched to background.
Scammers often use fake photos theyโ€™ve found online.

Tip: Do an image search of your admirer to help determine if they really are who they say they are. You can use image search services such as Google or TinEye.

Follow up scams
Scammers will often try to take advantage when youโ€™re feeling vulnerable and try to extract more money from you through a follow up scam.

Some common follow up scams include:

offers from a law enforcement agency to investigate your scam and retrieve your money for a fee. Law enforcement agencies do not charge for their services
a doctor calling you to alert you that the scammer urgently needs medical bills to be paid or they might die
a woman contacting you to explain she is the scammerโ€™s wife and wants to escape him but needs money to do so.
These are only a few of the follow up approaches scammers may use try to get more money from you. New approaches could be quite different from the original scam and could come quickly or some time later. Scammers may have passed your details to other scammers who use entirely different methods and the new approach may seem totally unrelated to the original scam.

More information
Types of scams
The ACCC provides information on the most common types of scams targeting the Australian community, and collects and publishes data on these scam types.

Where to get help
If you’ve lost money to a scam or given out your personal details to a scammer, you’re unlikely to get your money back. However there are steps you can take straight away to limit the damage and protect yourself from further loss.

Real life stories
Read our real life stories to see how you can learn from these experiences and help stop the scams from spreading.
Online resources
We’ve compiled a collection of online resources and useful sites to help you understand, recognise and avoid scams.