Tag Archives: racist

Lori Lakin Hutcherson wrote this article for Good Black News. Lori is the editor-in-chief at GBN. ~ Humanity

My White Friend Asked Me on Facebook to Explain White Privilege. I Decided to Be Honest
He wanted to know how institutional racism has made an impact on my life. I’m glad he asked, because I was ready to answer.

Most of what I share below is mild compared to what others in my family and community have endured Photo by T Y L E R G E B H A R T/Unsplash.

Yesterday I was tagged in a post by an old high school friend asking me and a few others a very public, direct question about white privilege and racism. I feel compelled not only to publish his query, but also my response to it, as it may be a helpful discourse for more than just a few folks on Facebook.

Here’s his post:

To all of my Black or mixed race FB friends, I must profess a blissful ignorance of this “White Privilege” of which I’m apparently guilty of possessing. By not being able to fully put myself in the shoes of someone from a background/race/religion/gender/nationality/body type that differs from my own makes me part of the problem, according to what I’m now hearing. Despite my treating everyone with respect and humor my entire life (as far as I know), I’m somehow complicit in the misfortune of others. I’m not saying I’m colorblind, but whatever racism/sexism/other -ism my life experience has instilled in me stays within me, and is not manifested in the way I treat others (which is not the case with far too many, I know).

So that I may be enlightened, can you please share with me some examples of institutional racism that have made an indelible mark upon you? If I am to understand this, I need people I know personally to show me how I’m missing what’s going on. Personal examples only. I’m not trying to be insensitive, I only want to understand (but not from the media). I apologize if this comes off as crass or offends anyone.

Here’s my response:

Hi, Jason. First off, I hope you don’t mind that I’ve quoted your post and made it part of mine. I think the heart of what you’ve asked of your friends of color is extremely important and I think my response needs much more space than as a reply on your feed. I truly thank you for wanting to understand what you are having a hard time understanding. Coincidentally, over the last few days I have been thinking about sharing some of the incidents of prejudice/racism I’ve experienced in my lifetime—in fact I just spoke with my sister Lesa about how to best do this yesterday—because I realized many of my friends—especially the white ones—have no idea what I’ve experienced/dealt with unless they were present (and aware) when it happened. There are two reasons for this: 1) because not only as a human being do I suppress the painful and uncomfortable in an effort to make it go away, I was also taught within my community (I was raised in the ’70s and ’80s—it’s shifted somewhat now) and by society at large NOT to make a fuss, speak out, or rock the boat. To just “deal with it,” lest more trouble follow (which, sadly, it often does); 2) fear of being questioned or dismissed with “Are you sure that’s what you heard?” or “Are you sure that’s what they meant?” and being angered and upset all over again by well-meaning-but-hurtful and essentially unsupportive responses.

So, again, I’m glad you asked, because I really want to answer. But as I do, please know a few things first: 1) This is not even close to the whole list. I’m cherry-picking because none of us have all day; 2) I’ve been really lucky. Most of what I share below is mild compared to what others in my family and community have endured; 3) I’m going to go in chronological order so you might begin to glimpse the tonnage and why what many white folks might feel is a “where did all of this come from?” moment in society has been festering individually and collectively for the LIFETIME of pretty much every black or brown person living in America today, regardless of wealth or opportunity; 4) Some of what I share covers sexism, too—intersectionality is another term I’m sure you’ve heard and want to put quotes around, but it’s a real thing too, just like white privilege. But you’ve requested a focus on personal experiences with racism, so here it goes:

1. When I was 3, my family moved into an upper-middle-class, all-white neighborhood. We had a big backyard, so my parents built a pool. Not the only pool on the block, but the only one neighborhood boys started throwing rocks into. White boys. One day my mom ID’d one as the boy from across the street, went to his house, told his mother, and, fortunately, his mother believed mine. My mom not only got an apology, but also had that boy jump in our pool and retrieve every single rock. No more rocks after that. Then mom even invited him to come over to swim sometime if he asked permission. Everyone became friends. This one has a happy ending because my mom was and is badass about matters like these, but I hope you can see that the white privilege in this situation is being able to move into a “nice” neighborhood and be accepted not harassed, made to feel unwelcome, or prone to acts of vandalism and hostility.

  1. When my older sister was 5, a white boy named Mark called her a “nigger” after she beat him in a race at school. She didn’t know what it meant, but in her gut she knew it was bad. This was the first time I’d seen my father the kind of angry that has nowhere to go. I somehow understood it was because not only had some boy verbally assaulted his daughter and had gotten away with it, it had way too early introduced her (and me) to that term and the reality of what it meant—that some white people would be cruel and careless with black people’s feelings just because of our skin color. Or our achievement. If it’s unclear in any way, the point here is if you’ve never had a defining moment in your childhood or your life where you realize your skin color alone makes other people hate you, you have white privilege.
  2. Sophomore year of high school. I had Mr. Melrose for Algebra 2. Some time within the first few weeks of class, he points out that I’m “the only spook” in the class. This was meant to be funny. It wasn’t. So, I doubt it will surprise you I was relieved when he took medical leave after suffering a heart attack and was replaced by a sub for the rest of the semester. The point here is, if you’ve never been ‘the only one’ of your race in a class, at a party, on a job, etc. and/or it’s been pointed out in a “playful” fashion by the authority figure in said situation, you have white privilege.
  3. When we started getting our college acceptances senior year, I remember some white male classmates were pissed that a black classmate had gotten into UCLA while they didn’t. They said that affirmative action had given him “their spot” and it wasn’t fair. An actual friend of theirs. Who’d worked his ass off. The point here is, if you’ve never been on the receiving end of the assumption that when you’ve achieved something it’s only because it was taken away from a white person who “deserved it,” you have white privilege.
  4. When I got accepted to Harvard (as a fellow AP student, you were witness to what an academic beast I was in high school, yes?), three separate times I encountered white strangers as I prepped for my maiden trip to Cambridge that rankle to this day. The first was the white doctor giving me a physical at Kaiser:

Me: “I need to send an immunization report to my college so I can matriculate.”

Doctor: “Where are you going?”

Me: “Harvard.”

Doctor: “You mean the one in Massachusetts?”

The second was in a store, looking for supplies I needed from Harvard’s suggested “what to bring with you” list.

Store employee: “Where are you going?”

Me: “Harvard.”

Store employee: “You mean the one in Massachusetts?”

The third was at UPS, shipping off boxes of said “what to bring” to Harvard. I was in line behind a white boy mailing boxes to Princeton and in front of a white woman sending her child’s boxes to wherever.

Woman to the boy: “What college are you going to?” Boy: “Princeton.”

Woman: “Congratulations!”

Woman to me: “Where are you sending your boxes?” Me: “Harvard.”

Woman: “You mean the one in Massachusetts?”

I think: “No, bitch, the one downtown next to the liquor store.” But I say, gesturing to my LABELED boxes: “Yes, the one in Massachusetts.”

Then she says congratulations, but it’s too fucking late. The point here is, if no one has ever questioned your intellectual capabilities or attendance at an elite institution based solely on your skin color, you have white privilege.

  1. In my freshman college tutorial, our small group of 4–5 was assigned to read Thoreau, Emerson, Malcolm X, Joseph Conrad, Dreiser, etc. When it was the week to discuss The Autobiography of Malcolm X, one white boy boldly claimed he couldn’t even get through it because he couldn’t relate and didn’t think he should be forced to read it. I don’t remember the words I said, but I still remember the feeling—I think it’s what doctors refer to as chandelier pain—as soon as a sensitive area on a patient is touched, they shoot through the roof—that’s what I felt. I know I said something like my whole life I’ve had to read “things that don’t have anything to do with me or that I relate to” but I find a way anyway because that’s what learning is about—trying to understand other people’s perspectives. The point here is—the canon of literature studied in the United States, as well as the majority of television and movies, have focused primarily on the works or achievements of white men. So, if you have never experienced or considered how damaging it is/was/could be to grow up without myriad role models and images in school that reflect you in your required reading material or in the mainstream media, you have white privilege.
  • All seniors at Harvard are invited to a fancy, seated group lunch with our respective dorm masters. (Yes, they were called “masters” up until this February, when they changed it to “faculty deans,” but that’s just a tasty little side dish to the main course of this remembrance). While we were being served by the Dunster House cafeteria staff—the black ladies from Haiti and Boston who ran the line daily (I still remember Jackie’s kindness and warmth to this day)—Master Sally mused out loud how proud they must be to be serving the nation’s best and brightest. I don’t know if they heard her, but I did, and it made me uncomfortable and sick. The point here is, if you’ve never been blindsided when you are just trying to enjoy a meal by a well-paid faculty member’s patronizing and racist assumptions about how grateful black people must feel to be in their presence, you have white privilege.
  • While I was writing on a television show in my 30s, my new white male boss—who had only known me for a few days—had unbeknownst to me told another writer on staff he thought I was conceited, didn’t know as much I thought I did, and didn’t have the talent I thought I had. And what exactly had happened in those few days? I disagreed with a pitch where he suggested our lead female character carelessly leave a potholder on the stove, burning down her apartment. This character being a professional caterer. When what he said about me was revealed months later (by then he’d come to respect and rely on me), he apologized for prejudging me because I was a black woman. I told him he was ignorant and clearly had a lot to learn. It was a good talk because he was remorseful and open. But the point here is, if you’ve never been on the receiving end of a boss’s prejudiced, uninformed “how dare she question my ideas” badmouthing based on solely on his ego and your race, you have white privilege.
  • On my very first date with my now husband, I climbed into his car and saw baby wipes on the passenger-side floor. He said he didn’t have kids, they were just there to clean up messes in the car. I twisted to secure my seatbelt and saw a stuffed animal in the rear window. I gave him a look. He said, “I promise, I don’t have kids. That’s only there so I don’t get stopped by the police.” He then told me that when he drove home from work late at night, he was getting stopped by cops constantly because he was a black man in a luxury car and they assumed that either it was stolen or he was a drug dealer. When he told a cop friend about this, Warren was told to put a stuffed animal in the rear window because it would change “his profile” to that of a family man and he was much less likely to be stopped. The point here is, if you’ve never had to mask the fruits of your success with a floppy-eared, stuffed bunny rabbit so you won’t get harassed by the cops on the way home from your gainful employment (or never had a first date start this way), you have white privilege.
  • Six years ago, I started a Facebook page that has grown into a website called Good Black News because I was shocked to find there were no sites dedicated solely to publishing the positive things black people do. (And let me explain here how biased the coverage of mainstream media is in case you don’t already have a clue—as I curate, I can’t tell you how often I have to swap out a story’s photo to make it as positive as the content. Photos published of black folks in mainstream media are very often sullen- or angry-looking. Even when it’s a positive story! I also have to alter headlines constantly to 1) include a person’s name and not have it just be “Black Man Wins Settlement” or “Carnegie Hall Gets 1st Black Board Member,” or 2) rephrase it from a subtle subjugator like “ABC taps Viola Davis as Series Lead” to “Viola Davis Lands Lead on ABC Show” as is done for, say, Jennifer Aniston or Steven Spielberg. I also receive a fair amount of highly offensive racist trolling. I don’t even respond. I block and delete ASAP. The point here is, if you’ve never had to rewrite stories and headlines or swap photos while being trolled by racists when all you’re trying to do on a daily basis is promote positivity and share stories of hope and achievement and justice, you have white privilege.

OK, Jason, there’s more, but I’m exhausted. And my kids need dinner. Remembering and reliving many of these moments has been a strain and a drain (and, again, this ain’t even the half or the worst of it). But I hope my experiences shed some light for you on how institutional and personal racism have affected the entire life of a friend of yours to whom you’ve only been respectful and kind. I hope what I’ve shared makes you realize it’s not just strangers, but people you know and care for who have suffered and are suffering because we are excluded from the privilege you have not to be judged, questioned, or assaulted in any way because of your race.

As to you “being part of the problem,” trust me, nobody is mad at you for being white. Nobody. Just like nobody should be mad at me for being black. Or female. Or whatever. But what IS being asked of you is to acknowledge that white privilege DOES exist and not only to treat people of races that differ from yours “with respect and humor,” but also to stand up for fair treatment and justice, not to let “jokes” or “off-color” comments by friends, co-workers, or family slide by without challenge, and to continually make an effort to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, so we may all cherish and respect our unique and special contributions to society as much as we do our common ground.

With much love and respect,

Lori

This article was originally published by Good Black News. It has been edited for YES! Magazine.

Lori Lakin Hutcherson wrote this article for Good Black News. Lori is the editor-in-chief at GBN.

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Silly Racist Prick ~ 🥇

Interesting that thought. I sat here mulling over these thoughts, sounds straight forward until if go over our family pedigree (?) . As I added to my family name ancestry oh my goodness me ..First I’m just a mongrel breed crossed with white, black, man made religious groups , at least now I know for shore WTF who cares who you are mate. Cause at the end of the day you not getting out alive 🥂🍺

Sent from Yahoo7 Mail on Android
On Fri., 14 Jun. 2019 at 8:57 am, Allen<petersaj@bigpond.net.au> wrote:

The term “Racist” is an important tool in the Marxist tool bag, a very effective one it seems.

“This is an interesting and different point of view from Britain. Food for thought.

Does make you stop and think. When does political correctness go too far?”

Racist – ME?

A thought provoking passage written by an ENGLISHMAN about the current situation in HIS homeland – this is thought provoking and is equally relevant in other countries…

I have been wondering about why whites are racists, and no other race is?

There are British Africans, British Chinese, British Asian, British Turks, etc., etc., etc.

And then there are just British. You know what I mean, plain ‘ole’ English people that were born here. You can include the Welsh, the Scottish and the people who live off our shores of Great Britain on tiny , Towel Head, Paki, Camel Jockey, Beaner, Gook or Chink, you call me a racist.

You say that whites commit a lot of violence against you. So why are the ghettos the most dangerous places to live?

You have the Muslim Council of Great Britain.

You have Black History Month.

You have swimming pools for Asian women.

You have Islamic banks for Muslims only.

You have year of the dragon day for Chinese people.

If we had a White Pride Day, you would call us racists.

If we had White History Month, we’d be racists.

If we had any organisation for only whites to ‘advance’ OUR lives, we’d be racists.

A white woman could not be in the Miss Black Britain or Miss Asia, but any colour can be in the Miss UK.

If we had a college fund that only gave white students scholarships, you know, we’d be racists.

There are over 200 openly proclaimed Muslim only schools in England. Yet if there were ‘White schools only’, that would be  racist!

In the Bradford riots and the Toxteth riots, you believed that you were standing-up for your race and rights. If we stood-up for our race and rights, you would call us racists.

You are proud to be black, brown, yellow and orange, and you’re not afraid to announce it. But when we announce our white pride, you call us racists.

We fly our flag, we are racists. If we celebrate St George’s day we are racists.

You can fly your flag and it’s called diversity. You celebrate your cultures and it’s called multiculturalism.

You rob us, car-jack us, and rape our daughters. But, when a white police officer arrests a black gang member or beats up an Asian drug dealer running from the law and posing a threat to society, you call him a racist.

I am proud, but you call me a racist. 

Why is it that only whites can be racists??

There is nothing improper about this e-mail.  Let’s see which of you are proud enough to send it on.

I sadly don’t think many will. That’s why we have LOST most of OUR RIGHTS in this country. We won’t stand up for ourselves!

BEING PROUD TO BE WHITE! It’s not a crime, YET, but it’s getting very close!

It has been estimated that ONLY 55% of those reaching this point in this e-mail, will pass it on.

Oh my goodness gracious
Why do I waste my time
With junk emails
Like this crappy stuff
Life’s not meant for wasting
Your life moaning about
Bet that guy thinks he’s invincible.
Here I am writing on a table in the local coffee shop
Considering what I’m going to feed my cat.
On a mobile phone too like all the other ones around here.
Funny that we went to school to learn touch typing 😂
What a bloody waste that was. Look at me one finger key board warrior. Thinking lately where all that money went on education my family thought was so necessary to have bet if they knew I would end up typing with one finger and self employed as a journalist living with my cat cost them
The moral to the idiot that sent the email out is
Mate is in self denial 🥉🥈🥇🏅
Congratulations Mr Peterson
You’re now posted on News Rooms Corp Services
Expect emails you way Honey
Australia 😁

Are we a racist Nation ?~ America or any COUNTRY. Do you believe that Hate SPEACH is against HUMANITY- answer that – Question yourself – is your insides the same as everyone else. 🤗 Perhaps others need this right now to understand we ARE Brothers and Sisters on Earth together. 🤗 Interesting stuff that isn’t it folk! Keep reading 😊simple little Thoughts of the day 😁 HELLO WORLD sprinkle KINDNESS wherever you go- it’s free you know 😁😅

From day one, it’s just been my white mom and me, although that’s nothing I would complain about. Throughout my life, she has been one of the only people in my white family to acknowledge and promote me being black. Since I never knew or met my father or the black side of my family, that was a big thing. I had nobody of color in my known family and for a while, very few black people in my life at all. Looking back on 18 years of living, my mom has been the only person in my family who encourages me and helps me understand what it means to be black, live life as a black youth and young man. She’s the only person who ever brought black role models into my life and acknowledged the struggles I’ve faced being a black young man.

Malachi in a football uniform on the field with his mother.

One of the largest nuisances I’ve faced has been people constantly insisting that I “pick a side.” I was born to a white mom and a black father who was never present, making me half black and light skinned. Because of who I am, people throughout my life, especially into high school, would insist on me being either black or white. Maybe it was because I’m from the south, but people casually tell me I am “too white” to really be black. And, yet for someone who was “too white,” I constantly dealt with the disadvantages that came with being black in the American south.

My grandma is one of the people who constantly insisted I was white whenever she got the chance. If I ever mentioned being black around my grandma, she would always chime in with “you’re white, too” no matter who I was talking to or what the context was. She could literally be in another room as I mentioned being black and she would holler into the room that I’m also white. My grandmother once even sat me down to try and explain to me how President Obama was black, and I was different because I’m white. Even though we both are mixed are both were born of a white mother and black father, it seemed to miss her. To her President Obama and I were two totally different racial categories simply because she said so and could somehow justify it in her narrow mind. My mom explained to me that this is called cognitive dissonance.

No matter how much my grandma or others insisted I was white I still have to struggle with the burdens and microaggressions that black people regularly face. When I was 15 and 16 I learned to drive knowing that getting pulled over for any reason, even as small as for a speeding ticket, could get me shot by a cop without reason or cause. While other kids were learning to yield to pedestrians, my mom taught me to put my hands on the dash and not make any sudden moves in the case of a traffic stop.

I learned that the white cop who stopped me as I was walking around Downtown Fort Myers with my white girlfriend just to ask her in the middle of our date “Are you okay? Is this man bothering you?” wouldn’t see me as white but as a black man who has no business walking around town with a white young lady. He sees me as a nuisance and a trouble maker.

I grew up knowing that no matter how white I am, confederate flag toting rednecks would still have no problem telling me and my friends to “go back home you niggers” as they drove by in their pickup trucks. Whenever somebody asks what race I am I proudly say that I am black. Because being half white has shown me the privileges that come with being white while providing me access to none of them. Being half black simply gives me a window to peer into the house of the white world as I stand outside getting soaked by the downpour of burdens that come with being black.

We had a black PRESIDENT

We had a black First Lady

We had black attorney general’s, one man and one woman

We have a black Secretary of State

We had a black Chief of Staff for the Armed Services

We have a black female National Security Advisors

A back woman is among the ten wealthiest people in the contry

We have a black Supreme Court Justice

We have a Hispanic female Supreme Court Justice

We have black Congressmen, black Senators, black mayors and black entertainers

We have black Police Officers and black Firefighters

We have a Black Miss American Pagent

We have a black woman win the Miss American Pagent ( no White Miss American Pageants allowed) 😊

The National Football League is 70% black

The National Basket League is 75% black

Major League Baseball is 45% black

All these accomplishments, yet African Americans are just now topping 13% of the American population

Still believe we are a racist nation? PROBABLY

WE WERE ALL HUMANS

UNTIL

RACE DISCONNECTED US,

RELIGION SEPARATED US,

POLITICS DIVIDED US,

AND WEALTH CLASSIFIED US.

🤐

The fact that humanity
Has to clarify that any lives
Matter
Should be concern enough 🤗

Racist ~ Bigoted Parameters

So the solution to teaching Native American culture or history (or the culture or history of any group of people for that matter, indigenous or not) is to reduce it to follow the same set of racist or bigoted parameters that caused the problem in the first place? Good grief.

It presents an interesting problem in the real world as there are a whole hell of a lot more schools and classrooms than there are Native American teachers. By the logic in that meme, most schools would be reduced to teaching little more than Scots-Irish history from the post-colonial Caucasian perspective. Surely that’s exactly what would be ideal to avoid.

But why stop there? Anthropologists shouldn’t be allowed to lecture on any culture they are not from or originally part of. I guess we can simply dismiss an epic amount of scientific literature and anthropological data that allows us to understand other cultures and subgroups. Simply because that information hasn’t come to us directly from a person who is a member of that culture, ethnicity or race.

Do you make more finite distinctions between race, ethnicity and culture/sub-culture? How far have you actually thought this out? It’s easy enough to bang together a meme and post it on Facebook or copypasta and come off as pithy. It’s quite another to actually think something through to its logical end.

How does your grand design apply to mixed race/culture kids? Would they be allowed to teach one subject (pick a parent) or both subjects based on their race/ethnicity or… neither. Why stop with race and ethnicity? Surely you could apply the same logic to class. Only people that were raised in a certain socioeconomic class would then be allowed to teach anyone else from that same socioeconomic class.

The irony is too rich, my family comes from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado and very much a part of the Na-Dené culture. Jicarilla to be exact. So frankly you’re preaching to the choir in terms of trying to break down all the injustices done. I get it. My family gets it… we’ve understood it from the very first day that the Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and his men set foot in North America in 1598, in particular, the Province of Santa Fe de Nuevo México.I suspect the Na-Dené people would have a good chuckle at the absurdity of the meme.

David Ison So the solution to teaching Native American culture or history (or the culture or history of any group of people for that matter, indigenous or not) is to reduce it to follow the same set of racist or bigoted parameters that caused the problem in the first place? Good grief.

It presents an interesting problem in the real world as there are a whole hell of a lot more schools and classrooms than there are Native American teachers. By the logic in that meme, most schools would be reduced to teaching little more than Scots-Irish history from the post-colonial Caucasian perspective. Surely that’s exactly what would be ideal to avoid.

But why stop there? Anthropologists shouldn’t be allowed to lecture on any culture they are not from or originally part of. I guess we can simply dismiss an epic amount of scientific literature and anthropological data that allows us to understand other cultures and subgroups. Simply because that information hasn’t come to us directly from a person who is a member of that culture, ethnicity or race.

Do you make more finite distinctions between race, ethnicity and culture/sub-culture? How far have you actually thought this out? It’s easy enough to bang together a meme and post it on Facebook or copypasta and come off as pithy. It’s quite another to actually think something through to its logical end.

How does your grand design apply to mixed race/culture kids? Would they be allowed to teach one subject (pick a parent) or both subjects based on their race/ethnicity or… neither. Why stop with race and ethnicity? Surely you could apply the same logic to class. Only people that were raised in a certain socioeconomic class would then be allowed to teach anyone else from that same socioeconomic class.

The irony is too rich, my family comes from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado and very much a part of the Na-Dené culture. Jicarilla to be exact. So frankly you’re preaching to the choir in terms of trying to break down all the injustices done. I get it. My family gets it… we’ve understood it from the very first day that the Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and his men set foot in North America in 1598, in particular, the Province of Santa Fe de Nuevo México.I suspect the Na-Dené people would have a good chuckle at the absurdity of the meme.

Harmony Day is celebrated annually on March 21st in Australia. Harmony Day began in 1999, coinciding with the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. (Wiki)🤗

Harmony Day is celebrated annually on March 21st in Australia. Harmony Day began in 1999, coinciding with the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. (Wiki)

Harmony needs to return to our hearts, soul & our land. With all the evil controlling us, we must stand tall and harmony & humanity starts in our homes.

Teach each other, support each other. Guide our children… ❤💫 (KD)

PEACE BE WITH YOU always 💥

Don’t live in a box your better than that ~ PEACE BE WITH YOU 💙💙💙

MARK, why do you feel intimidated, need to be anything at all …what has those Racists fools have anything to do with a Higher Power.

If people choose to live in the box calling themselves a Man made religion that’s their business if they chose this way to live.

At the end of the day we are all brothers and sisters on earth together.

Man is doing a terrible job of destroying our home earth .

”if there were no countries no man made religion wouldn’t earth be an amazing place?”

Between all these titles you refer to spreading hatred when will we ever learn.

Whether there is a God or not only when you die will you know the answer until then you need to get out of your box and remove your made up title too Mark.

Your Statement alone is RACIST to many humans on earth.

Nobody on earth needs to feel uncomfortable in their daily lives.

AT THE END OF THE DAY NO ONE GETS OUT OF THIS LIFE ALIVE LOL .
THAT YOU CAN BE SURE OFF. 🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗
,

Humanity FREEDOM of SPEACH.

Today on Facebook Soda (she muso) did comment with passion how she feels about FACEBOOK denying Friends what all folk in the Capitalised SOCIETY that we have been indoctrinated into since birth.

FREEDOM OF SPEECH !

UNFORTUNATELY THIS WORD IN THE ENGLISH DICTIONARY SHOULD BE DELETED.

Take a moment to read, maybe kindly you may need to hear this right this moment

Here is my condensed reply to Soda to ponder on ( waiting for the reply )

Soda Lee I get it, believe me .

We were reared with Free Speech enjoyed a very free lifestyle.

AT WHAT PRICE DO WE NOW PAY now HONEY🤐 IN THE WORK SPACE WE DEAL WITH free SPEACH is culled.

Reason being they don’t trust anyone say and do hateful comments, hurt all living Creatures with this viral hate.

Man made Religion is not Freedom of SPEECH it’s an excuse to murder the children off our future freedom of CHOICE

AT WHAT PRICE did we pay for Freedom of SPEECH.

When my Family were sent to War for Freedom, did they realise what they had done to our family the Government of the day. (Boys and toys plus the egos of men)

Governments that spook Freedom of SPEECH are the monsters of the devil for monetary policy rewards lining self pockets

War is Denying all humans a Free life of choice.

The term CHOICE is your responsibility not this word FREEDOM OF SPEACH.

Humanity is a gift to this world. Peace be with you all the days of your LIFE.

Choice is your true gift, use it wisely and life is sweeter.

DEAR SODA you are beautiful to. ❤

Facebook users be aware please share inspiration, Happiness not hate speech.

Facebook users this platform is free to you to follow family and friends not play or Religion or Politics.

Always be polite, gracious

Do not seek attention by Judgement or Racist comments

Are you comments current or fake news, look further afield before posting.