Category Archives: Heathly Living

“Josh Groban – You Are Loved (Don’t Give Up)”~ BROKEN Soul ©

Don’t Give up

Have you ever wondered why folk give up!

Watch the warning signs
Someone inside perhaps retreats within themselves
Silence is seen as escapism when in fact what happens inside a living being is our message from our gut really is the bodies way of reacting to lack of water, nourishment, surviving drought or famine inside all living matter fighting for survival. The role then is sent to the brainwaves simply GIVE UP.

WE ARE ALL FRAGILE
NO ONE IS INVINCIBLE 🙁

Or maybe a sensitive Soul is mentally tired.

Mental illness has naught to do with giving up is a dangerous precursor to SUICIDE.

Animals, Humans, plants give up too. Why?

This Earth is Fragile we to are fragile

Every living being has this point called Fragility

We never know, what lays behind those eyes until the day we turn around to find another life LOST

Fragile– life is everyone’s responsibility.

Promises made at the moment, that are forfeited by the way perhaps unintended Promise’s never kept could destroy a life
Scared, disappointed, anger, loss of dignity, loss of trust, loss of love, all are a precursor to an already FRAGILE Soul.

Thought for the day
“When you make a promise — that is your word”
You are only respected by your “Word”of promise you have made.
Another Gentleman may say you are as good as your Word!

MM©®™

💥
Here at Dazzle the team intends to look at Broken Soul –
SUICIDE — a subject we will all deal with around our lives with family, friends also with strangers who are FRAGILE.

EDITOR: DAZZLE
This Category Blogging is not Medical advice or makes any claims pertaining to information in this chapter of Dazzled.
You are invited to participate in this Category by sending your thoughts by email to the Central Office for consideration to publish here. Thank you and blessings 🕯

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HEALTHY LIFESTYLE ~ MASTURBATING QUESTIONS ANSWERED

Q: I feel guilty 100% of the time after masturbating—regardless of if I viewed porn or not. I know this is likely the result of a religious upbringing and even though I wouldn’t consider myself religious anymore the guilt remains. Even into my late teens, my parents would turn off the TV whenever a women’s underwear ad (such as Victoria’s Secret) was on. I know this guilt is irrational and would like advice on how to train myself to feel good about what’s natural; I figure if I was conditioned to feel guilt there must be a way to recondition myself and rid myself of these negative feelings. I do not allow porn and masturbation to get in the way of any necessary activities, I only enjoy them during my free time; I know procrastination isn’t the reason for my guilt. Any insight and advice you could provide would be incredibly welcomed!

A: Isn’t it amazing how our upbringing could have such an impact on our views of sexuality, even though rationally we do not hold these beliefs? You are not alone! Unfortunately, it is rather common for someone who was brought up to believe that masturbation and sex before marriage are sinful to develop hang-ups about sex, usually involving lots of guilt and shame around their sexuality. There is no easy fix, however, you will have to work at changing the family narrative around sexuality. In other words, this doesn’t have to be your story. Try writing down all of your actual beliefs about sex, all the positives, etc., and make sure you read it often, especially before and after any sexual activity. It will take some time and practice, but over time, it is possible to change our sexual scripts.

Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure

Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure

1. Hydrate & Humidify
When full blown cold and flu systems occur, ease symptoms of nasal congestion and/or sinus congestion by adding chamomile flowers or 5–10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil (or both!) to boiling water, place your head under a towel over a pot of boiling water—keep a safe distance—and inhale the steaming vapors for 10–15 minutes. Drinking lots of water helps thin sticky mucous secretions, making them drain more easily from the sinuses, as well as keeps the mucous membranes moist. Plain, filtered water is best, but herbal teas can also help; ginger and peppermint help loosen and thin mucus, holy basil and licorice boost immunity, and marshmallow soothes irritated nasal passageways.

2. Use a Neti Pot
The Neti pot has been used in India’s system of Ayurveda for thousands of years. Today, its popularity is growing in the West, and it can be found in natural products stores everywhere. Made of glass, ceramic, or plastic, the Neti pot resembles an Aladdin’s lamp. It is designed to be filled with a saline solution and used to wash away pollens, mucus, viruses, and bacteria from nasal passages. The spout of the Neti pot is held to one nostril while leaning over a sink or basin, letting the water drain out of the other nostril. Research shows this technique can help ease allergy and sinus infection symptoms, and may even lower the chances of catching the common cold, according to some research. To make a saline solution for the Neti pot: Dissolve ½ tsp. noniodized salt in 1 cup of warm distilled or previously boiled water. Use once daily until symptoms subside.

3. Eat spirulina
Spirulina, a blue-green alga that can modulate immune function, is an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, an inflammation of the nasal membranes that’s characterized by sneezing, nasal congestion and nasal itching, that’s linked to sinusitis. In one study, spirulina significantly improved symptoms, including nasal discharge, sneezing, and congestion. It’s thought to protect against sinusitis via its antimicrobial actions. Look for it in powders, tablets or capsules, and be sure to choose high-quality varieties that have been tested to be free of heavy metals.

4. Clean house
Besides mold, other sources of indoor air pollution are often to blame for sinus woes. Generally, anything with fumes or a very strong odor—cigarette smoke, hairspray, oven cleaners, and other cleaning products—can exacerbate (or even cause) sinus problems. Keep indoor air clean: get rid of chemical-based cleaning products, and switch to natural, unscented products. An air purifier can help, or try an ozone generator—a machine that creates O3, or ozone. Ozone has been shown to remove airborne toxins and kill mold.

5. Give up dairy
It has long been thought that dairy increases congestion and mucous production, and can exacerbate respiratory problems. Until recently, scientific studies failed to show a relationship between dairy and mucus production. More recent studies suggest that the type of milk may be the culprit.

Certain breeds of cows produce milk containing beta-CM-7, a protein that can stimulate mucus glands in the sinuses, respiratory tract, and digestive tract in certain susceptible people. If you’re plagued by sinus problems, try getting rid of dairy for a few weeks to see if symptoms improve.

6. Take quercetin
Quercetin, an antioxidant found in apples, onions, citrus fruits, red wine, parsley, and tea, acts an antihistamine and can help reduce inflammation and modulate allergic reactions that lead to sinus problems. Or try quercetin supplements, especially those that contain bromelain, a naturally-occurring enzyme that has anti-inflammatory benefits.

In one study, bromelain was effective in reducing symptoms in people with chronic sinusitis. Another enzyme to try for sinus issues is serrapeptase. This remedy is becoming increasingly popular for addressing different types of pain and inflammatory conditions, including sinusitis. The enzyme has been clinically shown to break down mucus and promote a normal inflammatory response in the body.

7. Avoid mycotoxins
Mycotoxins, poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi, can exacerbate many sinus problems, especially those related to molds. Because they occur in common foods, they’re an often-missed source of sinus woes. If you suffer from chronic sinusitis, consider avoiding foods that are most likely to contain mycotoxins. These include peanuts, corn, wheat, barley, sugar, alcohol, cottonseed oil, aged cheese, and mushrooms or other fungi.

Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure
1. Hydrate & Humidify
When full blown cold and flu systems occur, ease symptoms of nasal congestion and/or sinus congestion by adding chamomile flowers or 5–10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil (or both!) to boiling water, place your head under a towel over a pot of boiling water—keep a safe distance—and inhale the steaming vapors for 10–15 minutes. Drinking lots of water helps thin sticky mucous secretions, making them drain more easily from the sinuses, as well as keeps the mucous membranes moist. Plain, filtered water is best, but herbal teas can also help; ginger and peppermint help loosen and thin mucus, holy basil and licorice boost immunity, and marshmallow soothes irritated nasal passageways.

You may also need to humidify. Dry air irritates already-inflamed sinus membranes, slows passage of mucus, and can exacerbate infections. If your home is excessively dry, use a vaporizer or humidifier. But don’t overdo it; too much humidity encourages the growth of mold, a common culprit in chronic sinus problems. The best range is 35 to 45 percent humidity. Or use humid air locally: take a hot shower, fill a sink with hot water and inhale the steam, or breathe in the mist coming from vaporizers (not the steam from humidifiers; it’s too hot and can damage delicate sinus membranes).

2. Use a Neti Pot
The Neti pot has been used in India’s system of Ayurveda for thousands of years. Today, its popularity is growing in the West, and it can be found in natural products stores everywhere. Made of glass, ceramic, or plastic, the Neti pot resembles an Aladdin’s lamp. It is designed to be filled with a saline solution and used to wash away pollens, mucus, viruses, and bacteria from nasal passages. The spout of the Neti pot is held to one nostril while leaning over a sink or basin, letting the water drain out of the other nostril. Research shows this technique can help ease allergy and sinus infection symptoms, and may even lower the chances of catching the common cold, according to some research. To make a saline solution for the Neti pot: Dissolve ½ tsp. noniodized salt in 1 cup of warm distilled or previously boiled water. Use once daily until symptoms subside.

3. Eat spirulina
Spirulina, a blue-green alga that can modulate immune function, is an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, an inflammation of the nasal membranes that’s characterized by sneezing, nasal congestion and nasal itching, that’s linked to sinusitis. In one study, spirulina significantly improved symptoms, including nasal discharge, sneezing, and congestion. It’s thought to protect against sinusitis via its antimicrobial actions. Look for it in powders, tablets or capsules, and be sure to choose high-quality varieties that have been tested to be free of heavy metals.

4. Clean house
Besides mold, other sources of indoor air pollution are often to blame for sinus woes. Generally, anything with fumes or a very strong odor—cigarette smoke, hairspray, oven cleaners, and other cleaning products—can exacerbate (or even cause) sinus problems. Keep indoor air clean: get rid of chemical-based cleaning products, and switch to natural, unscented products. An air purifier can help, or try an ozone generator—a machine that creates O3, or ozone. Ozone has been shown to remove airborne toxins and kill mold.

5. Give up dairy
It has long been thought that dairy increases congestion and mucous production, and can exacerbate respiratory problems. Until recently, scientific studies failed to show a relationship between dairy and mucus production. More recent studies suggest that the type of milk may be the culprit.

Certain breeds of cows produce milk containing beta-CM-7, a protein that can stimulate mucus glands in the sinuses, respiratory tract, and digestive tract in certain susceptible people. If you’re plagued by sinus problems, try getting rid of dairy for a few weeks to see if symptoms improve.

6. Take quercetin
Quercetin, an antioxidant found in apples, onions, citrus fruits, red wine, parsley, and tea, acts an antihistamine and can help reduce inflammation and modulate allergic reactions that lead to sinus problems. Or try quercetin supplements, especially those that contain bromelain, a naturally-occurring enzyme that has anti-inflammatory benefits.

In one study, bromelain was effective in reducing symptoms in people with chronic sinusitis. Another enzyme to try for sinus issues is serrapeptase. This remedy is becoming increasingly popular for addressing different types of pain and inflammatory conditions, including sinusitis. The enzyme has been clinically shown to break down mucus and promote a normal inflammatory response in the body.

7. Avoid mycotoxins
Mycotoxins, poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi, can exacerbate many sinus problems, especially those related to molds. Because they occur in common foods, they’re an often-missed source of sinus woes. If you suffer from chronic sinusitis, consider avoiding foods that are most likely to contain mycotoxins. These include peanuts, corn, wheat, barley, sugar, alcohol, cottonseed oil, aged cheese, and mushrooms or other fungi.

8. Take butterbur
The butterbur plant has been used for hundreds of years to treat headache, fever, and allergies; many modern studies show it can alleviate respiratory problems that lead to sinus issues. You’ll find butterbur in tinctures and capsules; look for a formula that’s standardized for petasin and isopetasin, the active component. Because the plant contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), chemicals that can damage the liver, also choose products that are certified and labeled “PA-free.”

9. Increase vitamin D
It’s the best way to increase the body’s levels of vitamin D, which may alleviate sinus problems by enhancing immune function. More specifically, vitamin D suppresses inflammatory response, and better helps the body prevent viruses and infections in the sinuses. Studies have also shown people with chronic sinusitis have lower levels of vitamin D. About 10 to 15 minutes of direct sun three to four times a week is enough to help the body produce sufficient vitamin D. If you live in the northern United States, have darker skin, are over 70, or spend very little time in the sun, consider a vitamin D3 supplement.

10. Use a natural sinus spray
Commonly used as a natural, lower-calorie sugar substitute, xylitol is a sugar alcohol found in many fruits and vegetables including berries, plums, lettuce, and mushrooms. But there’s more to this sweet ingredient—xylitol’s unique molecular structure enables it to effectively stop bacteria in their tracks. Here’s how: bacteria and yeast like to “eat” xylitol as they would sugar, but unlike sugar, they can’t digest it—therefore, the bacteria essentially starve to death and do not reproduce. Research demonstrates that when used in nasal sprays, xylitol reduces bacteria in sinuses. Additionally, it works via osmosis to pull fluid into airways and helps moisturize and thin mucus.

Dr Harvey Washington Wiley

Dr Harvey Washington Wiley, the 19th century chemist whose ‘poison squad’ pioneered food safety – RN
Updated about 7 hours ago

PHOTO Harvey Washington Wiley was instrumental in bringing about regulations to boost sanitation and decrease food adulteration. GETTY: CORBIS
In major US cities in the late 19th century, dairy producers looking to cut costs would dilute milk using pond water.

The resulting greyish tinge would be corrected with a dose of plaster dust, and some yellow lead to give a golden hue.

Replacing the cream, which had been skimmed off, was nothing less than pureed calf brains.

Once the manufacturer was satisfied with the aesthetic of the product, the toxic chemical formaldehyde could be added to give the so-called “embalmed milk” a longer shelf life.

PHOTO A depiction of Death making candy tainted with arsenic and plaster of Paris. GETTY: HARPER’S WEEKLY
Milk was only one of a long list of commonly adulterated foods that included lead in cheese, brick dust in cinnamon, sawdust in ground coffee, and brown sugar spiked with crushed insects.

In the zenith of industrial capitalism, poor workers migrating to urban centres became golden geese for profit-hungry food manufacturers.

That was until a preacher’s son, Harvey Washington Wiley, dedicated his life to taming the seemingly untameable industry.

Wiley — with his ‘poison squad’ and a very peculiar experiment — gained international recognition for his role in the creation of legal food standards.

The ‘unregulated Wild West’ of food production
As the industrial revolution was applied to food processing, manufacturers rushed to embrace the rise of industrial chemistry and were knowingly selling harmful products.

Unchecked by government regulation, basic safety or even labelling requirements, they put profit before the health of their customers.

The target market for these adulterated products was the blue-collar workers, who were migrating to cities from rural areas and farm towns — and were desperately trying to stretch a dollar.

“There were no labels, and so there was no public pressure,” said Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist Deborah Blum, who has written a book on Wiley.

“It was just a pre-regulatory Wild West of food that permitted bad actors to do what they will, and so they did.”

Late Night Live
Wiley was the son of a southern Indianan famer who worked on the Underground Railroad that helped escaped slaves seek refuge in the north.

After briefly serving in the Civil War, Wiley became a chemistry professor, and in 1883 was named the Department of Agriculture’s chief chemist.

The department, traditionally concerned with agribusiness, became the vehicle for his 30-year campaign for safe food and proper labelling.

Wiley’s crusade was part of a larger Progressive movement which fought against the monopolies and government corruption that had accumulated throughout the 19th century.

Already alarmed at food adulteration, he delivered speeches and wrote popular articles, working closely with ‘muckraking’ journalists and the burgeoning pure food movement.

“He came in with this kind of moral crusade, Holy Roller attitude. He was determined to make a difference,” Blum said.

The poison squad and an unusual experiment
In response to Wiley’s growing public profile, the Food Manufacturers Association was set up to represent the interests of industry.

Misleading articles by non-existent journalists were circulated to harm his reputation while sympathetic allies were planted within the US government.

President Theodore Roosevelt, the progressive crusader famous for reigning in the octopus-like monopolies of the era, was not as forward thinking when it came to food regulation.

According to Blum, Roosevelt was often working with food businesses to make sure that his anti-monopoly regulations didn’t affect their income streams too drastically.

“Roosevelt would create secret boards to countermand some of his ideas and rulings as they try to get the law in place, and literally working with people who weaken the regulations,” she said.

PHOTO Theodore Roosevelt is remembered as a crusader of the Progressive Era GETTY: HULTON ARCHIVE
Despite his capacity as a writer and orator, it would not be Wiley’s advocacy that would cause the government to change its mind.

Rather, it was a particularly unusual experiment.

At the dawn of the 20th century, Wiley invited young clerks at the Department of Agriculture to eat three free meals a day cooked by a professional chef using farm-fresh ingredients.

The group, soon to be known as the ‘poison squad’, were asked to fine dine in the basement below the department’s offices every day for a year, their diet strictly limited to these meals.

PHOTO The members of Wiley’s ‘Poison Squad’ were assessed for their health and respectability before being invited to join. FLICKR: US FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
There was a catch.

Half of the perfectly prepared dishes in this makeshift kitchen were deliberately spiked with doses of suspected food additives — industrial chemicals like borax or salicylic acid.

In an act of bravery, the volunteers knowingly subjected themselves to poisoning in the name of science.

Not surprisingly, these various additives caused a host of health woes for the unlucky half including nausea, diarrhoea, vomiting, liver damage, kidney damage, and jaundice.

While lobbyists could suppress Wiley’s findings, they couldn’t control newspapers, which zealously relayed information about the group to a public that slowly elevated Wiley to a hero status.

PHOTO These idealistic volunteers embraced this motto on a sign in their special dining room — “none but the brave can eat the fare.” FLICKR: US FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
As awareness about food contents spread, an explosive novel called The Jungle was published by socialist writer Upton Sinclair in 1906.

It documented the life of immigrant meatpacking workers in the packing houses of Chicago, where “rats, poisoned bread, and meat” would end up mixed in the same food processor. The book sparked consumer fury.

The government’s hand was forced, and the Meat Inspection Act was passed with Roosevelt’s full support, followed a week later by the Pure Food and Drug Act.

Commonly known as ‘the Wiley Act’, it required that a drug’s active ingredients be written on its packaging, and meant unsafe products could be outlawed.

“The Pure Food and Drug Act meant now for the first time in American history you have the entry of consumer protection in law,” Blum said.

Gradually food safety standards were expanded and exported internationally and by mid-century became the rule rather than the exception throughout the developed world.

Consumers today, who value their breakfast free of borax, have Wiley to thank.

Posted earlier today at 5:00am

Pineapple Sugarcane Water

Pineapple Sugarcane Water
YIELD: 6 servings

PREP TIME: 3 minutes

Ingredients:

2 liters purified water
2 sticks sugar cane
4-5 large chunks fresh pineapple
ice
Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a large pitcher. Stir.
The longer the water sits, the more the pineapple and sugarcane flavors will infused into it.

Watermelon Detox Water

Watermelon Scented Water

Watermelon Scented Water Ingredients:
– 2 cups Seedless Watermelon, cubed
– 4 cups Water

Watermelon Scented Water Directions:
1. Place Watermelon in pitcher and cover with Water.
2. Let it sit a few hours in the refrigerator before drinking – so the water gets all the nice watermelon flavor.

Three Foods for an upset stomach

When you have an upset stomach, eating is the last thing you would want to do. But at the same time, eating certain food items can help you get over the situation.

So without further delay, we are going to list down these food items which can help you battle a messed up stomach.

Ginger: The presence of Gingerol in Ginger is proven to relieve nausea and indigestion. It also has anti-inflammatory properties as well.
Oatmeal: Oatmeal is full of soluble and insoluble fibre which can help you in fixing your stomach. It might taste bland but it can ease up the pain of bowel movement.
Bananas: Bananas are quite easy to digest. Also, they are loaded with prebiotic fibre which fuels the good bacteria in your gut.

Three benefits of black tea

When it comes to tea, you have a lot of options and Black Tea could just be one among the long list. And this is probably why a major portion of the tea lovers skip the drink.

But did you know that black tea has many health benefits? If you didn’t, read on to find out some of the health benefits of the drink.

Improves Heart Health: Many studies have found that people who consume the drink regularly have a decreased risk of heart diseases. This is because it has the ability to increase the antioxidant levels in your body.
Fights Cancer: It can reduce the risk of developing skin, prostate, ovarian and breast cancers. In Women, the drink increases the globulin hormones which in turn keep cancer away. Also, the presence of theaflavins in the tea destroys abnormal cells in the body.
Digestive relief: The healing and anti-inflammatory properties of the drink makes it a great remedy if you are having digestive problems.