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HEALTH

Causes of: MENTAL CONFUSION IN THE THIRD AGE – 

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Whenever I teach clinical medicine to students in the fourth year of medicine, I ask  the following question:

What are the causes of mental confusion in the elderly?

Some offer: “Tumors in the head”.  I answer: No!

Others suggest: “Early symptoms of Alzheimer’s”.  I answer again: No!

With each rejection of their answers, their responses dry up. And they are even more  open-mouthed when I list the three most common causes:

·        uncontrolled diabetes;

·         urinary infection;

·        dehydration

It may sound like a joke, but it isn’t.  People over 60 constantly stop feeling thirsty and consequently stop drinking fluids. When no one is around to remind them to drink fluids, they quickly dehydrate.  Dehydration is severe and affects the entire body.  It may cause abrupt mental confusion, a drop in blood pressure, increased heart palpitations,  angina (chest pain), coma and even death. This habit of forgetting to drink fluids begins at age 60 when we have just over 50% of the water we should have in our bodies.  People over 60 have a lower water reserve. This is part of the natural ageing process.

But there are more complications. Although they are dehydrated, they don’t feel like drinking water, because their internal balance mechanisms don’t work very well.

*Conclusion:* People over 60 years old dehydrate easily, not only because they have a  smaller water supply, but also because they do not feel the lack of water in the body. Although people over 60 may look healthy, the performance of reactions and chemical functions can damage their entire body.

So here are two alerts:

1) *Get into the habit of drinking liquids*. Liquids include water, juices, teas, coconut water,  milk, soups, and water-rich fruits, such as watermelon, melon, peaches and pineapple; Orange and tangerine also work, as well as cucumbers.

*The important thing is that every two hours, you must drink some liquid.  Remember this!*

2) Alert for family members: constantly offer fluids to people over 60.  At the same time, observe them. If you realize that they are rejecting liquids and, from one day to the next, they are irritable, breathless or display a lack of attention, these are almost certainly recurrent symptoms of dehydration.

*For people over 60* (Note, he doesn’t include Whisky or Beer!)

Wisdom
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HEALTH

How NOT to be an academic a**hole during Covid

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“Just as talking about mental health does not make you weak, making a space for people to talk about quitting the PhD does not make more people leave.” At The Thesis Whisperer, professor Inger Mewburn writes about mental health, quitting the PhD, and toxic positivity in academia.

How NOT to be an academic a**hole during Covid
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HEALTH

EU promotes development of Ukrainian geographical indications

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What awaits our producers which use European geographical indications in the names of their products, and why their own local brands are worth promoting?

EU promotes development of Ukrainian geographical indications

Thank you. I learnt something today

Kindness
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HEALTH

Did you know that

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Did you ever wonder why the color of our blood is red? Here’s the answer – the iron present in our blood forms a ring of atoms called porphyrin, the shape of this structure produces the red color. The shape of the porphyrin is affected by the presence of oxygen in your body.

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HEALTH

Health authorities issue alarming warning about essential oils – Yahoo News

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Health authorities issue alarming warning about essential oils – Yahoo News

https://yns.page.link/JLpSJ

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HEALTH

Ice man latest news release healthy LIFESTYLE CHOICES

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HEALTH

Australia Health Warning 2019

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www.healthdirect.gov.au/blog/when-to-get-the-flu-shot-in-australia-in-2019

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HEALTH

Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure

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Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure

1. Hydrate & Humidify
When full blown cold and flu systems occur, ease symptoms of nasal congestion and/or sinus congestion by adding chamomile flowers or 5–10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil (or both!) to boiling water, place your head under a towel over a pot of boiling water—keep a safe distance—and inhale the steaming vapors for 10–15 minutes. Drinking lots of water helps thin sticky mucous secretions, making them drain more easily from the sinuses, as well as keeps the mucous membranes moist. Plain, filtered water is best, but herbal teas can also help; ginger and peppermint help loosen and thin mucus, holy basil and licorice boost immunity, and marshmallow soothes irritated nasal passageways.

2. Use a Neti Pot
The Neti pot has been used in India’s system of Ayurveda for thousands of years. Today, its popularity is growing in the West, and it can be found in natural products stores everywhere. Made of glass, ceramic, or plastic, the Neti pot resembles an Aladdin’s lamp. It is designed to be filled with a saline solution and used to wash away pollens, mucus, viruses, and bacteria from nasal passages. The spout of the Neti pot is held to one nostril while leaning over a sink or basin, letting the water drain out of the other nostril. Research shows this technique can help ease allergy and sinus infection symptoms, and may even lower the chances of catching the common cold, according to some research. To make a saline solution for the Neti pot: Dissolve ½ tsp. noniodized salt in 1 cup of warm distilled or previously boiled water. Use once daily until symptoms subside.

3. Eat spirulina
Spirulina, a blue-green alga that can modulate immune function, is an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, an inflammation of the nasal membranes that’s characterized by sneezing, nasal congestion and nasal itching, that’s linked to sinusitis. In one study, spirulina significantly improved symptoms, including nasal discharge, sneezing, and congestion. It’s thought to protect against sinusitis via its antimicrobial actions. Look for it in powders, tablets or capsules, and be sure to choose high-quality varieties that have been tested to be free of heavy metals.

4. Clean house
Besides mold, other sources of indoor air pollution are often to blame for sinus woes. Generally, anything with fumes or a very strong odor—cigarette smoke, hairspray, oven cleaners, and other cleaning products—can exacerbate (or even cause) sinus problems. Keep indoor air clean: get rid of chemical-based cleaning products, and switch to natural, unscented products. An air purifier can help, or try an ozone generator—a machine that creates O3, or ozone. Ozone has been shown to remove airborne toxins and kill mold.

5. Give up dairy
It has long been thought that dairy increases congestion and mucous production, and can exacerbate respiratory problems. Until recently, scientific studies failed to show a relationship between dairy and mucus production. More recent studies suggest that the type of milk may be the culprit.

Certain breeds of cows produce milk containing beta-CM-7, a protein that can stimulate mucus glands in the sinuses, respiratory tract, and digestive tract in certain susceptible people. If you’re plagued by sinus problems, try getting rid of dairy for a few weeks to see if symptoms improve.

6. Take quercetin
Quercetin, an antioxidant found in apples, onions, citrus fruits, red wine, parsley, and tea, acts an antihistamine and can help reduce inflammation and modulate allergic reactions that lead to sinus problems. Or try quercetin supplements, especially those that contain bromelain, a naturally-occurring enzyme that has anti-inflammatory benefits.

In one study, bromelain was effective in reducing symptoms in people with chronic sinusitis. Another enzyme to try for sinus issues is serrapeptase. This remedy is becoming increasingly popular for addressing different types of pain and inflammatory conditions, including sinusitis. The enzyme has been clinically shown to break down mucus and promote a normal inflammatory response in the body.

7. Avoid mycotoxins
Mycotoxins, poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi, can exacerbate many sinus problems, especially those related to molds. Because they occur in common foods, they’re an often-missed source of sinus woes. If you suffer from chronic sinusitis, consider avoiding foods that are most likely to contain mycotoxins. These include peanuts, corn, wheat, barley, sugar, alcohol, cottonseed oil, aged cheese, and mushrooms or other fungi.

Natural Ways to Relieve Sinus Pressure
1. Hydrate & Humidify
When full blown cold and flu systems occur, ease symptoms of nasal congestion and/or sinus congestion by adding chamomile flowers or 5–10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil (or both!) to boiling water, place your head under a towel over a pot of boiling water—keep a safe distance—and inhale the steaming vapors for 10–15 minutes. Drinking lots of water helps thin sticky mucous secretions, making them drain more easily from the sinuses, as well as keeps the mucous membranes moist. Plain, filtered water is best, but herbal teas can also help; ginger and peppermint help loosen and thin mucus, holy basil and licorice boost immunity, and marshmallow soothes irritated nasal passageways.

You may also need to humidify. Dry air irritates already-inflamed sinus membranes, slows passage of mucus, and can exacerbate infections. If your home is excessively dry, use a vaporizer or humidifier. But don’t overdo it; too much humidity encourages the growth of mold, a common culprit in chronic sinus problems. The best range is 35 to 45 percent humidity. Or use humid air locally: take a hot shower, fill a sink with hot water and inhale the steam, or breathe in the mist coming from vaporizers (not the steam from humidifiers; it’s too hot and can damage delicate sinus membranes).

2. Use a Neti Pot
The Neti pot has been used in India’s system of Ayurveda for thousands of years. Today, its popularity is growing in the West, and it can be found in natural products stores everywhere. Made of glass, ceramic, or plastic, the Neti pot resembles an Aladdin’s lamp. It is designed to be filled with a saline solution and used to wash away pollens, mucus, viruses, and bacteria from nasal passages. The spout of the Neti pot is held to one nostril while leaning over a sink or basin, letting the water drain out of the other nostril. Research shows this technique can help ease allergy and sinus infection symptoms, and may even lower the chances of catching the common cold, according to some research. To make a saline solution for the Neti pot: Dissolve ½ tsp. noniodized salt in 1 cup of warm distilled or previously boiled water. Use once daily until symptoms subside.

3. Eat spirulina
Spirulina, a blue-green alga that can modulate immune function, is an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, an inflammation of the nasal membranes that’s characterized by sneezing, nasal congestion and nasal itching, that’s linked to sinusitis. In one study, spirulina significantly improved symptoms, including nasal discharge, sneezing, and congestion. It’s thought to protect against sinusitis via its antimicrobial actions. Look for it in powders, tablets or capsules, and be sure to choose high-quality varieties that have been tested to be free of heavy metals.

4. Clean house
Besides mold, other sources of indoor air pollution are often to blame for sinus woes. Generally, anything with fumes or a very strong odor—cigarette smoke, hairspray, oven cleaners, and other cleaning products—can exacerbate (or even cause) sinus problems. Keep indoor air clean: get rid of chemical-based cleaning products, and switch to natural, unscented products. An air purifier can help, or try an ozone generator—a machine that creates O3, or ozone. Ozone has been shown to remove airborne toxins and kill mold.

5. Give up dairy
It has long been thought that dairy increases congestion and mucous production, and can exacerbate respiratory problems. Until recently, scientific studies failed to show a relationship between dairy and mucus production. More recent studies suggest that the type of milk may be the culprit.

Certain breeds of cows produce milk containing beta-CM-7, a protein that can stimulate mucus glands in the sinuses, respiratory tract, and digestive tract in certain susceptible people. If you’re plagued by sinus problems, try getting rid of dairy for a few weeks to see if symptoms improve.

6. Take quercetin
Quercetin, an antioxidant found in apples, onions, citrus fruits, red wine, parsley, and tea, acts an antihistamine and can help reduce inflammation and modulate allergic reactions that lead to sinus problems. Or try quercetin supplements, especially those that contain bromelain, a naturally-occurring enzyme that has anti-inflammatory benefits.

In one study, bromelain was effective in reducing symptoms in people with chronic sinusitis. Another enzyme to try for sinus issues is serrapeptase. This remedy is becoming increasingly popular for addressing different types of pain and inflammatory conditions, including sinusitis. The enzyme has been clinically shown to break down mucus and promote a normal inflammatory response in the body.

7. Avoid mycotoxins
Mycotoxins, poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi, can exacerbate many sinus problems, especially those related to molds. Because they occur in common foods, they’re an often-missed source of sinus woes. If you suffer from chronic sinusitis, consider avoiding foods that are most likely to contain mycotoxins. These include peanuts, corn, wheat, barley, sugar, alcohol, cottonseed oil, aged cheese, and mushrooms or other fungi.

8. Take butterbur
The butterbur plant has been used for hundreds of years to treat headache, fever, and allergies; many modern studies show it can alleviate respiratory problems that lead to sinus issues. You’ll find butterbur in tinctures and capsules; look for a formula that’s standardized for petasin and isopetasin, the active component. Because the plant contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), chemicals that can damage the liver, also choose products that are certified and labeled “PA-free.”

9. Increase vitamin D
It’s the best way to increase the body’s levels of vitamin D, which may alleviate sinus problems by enhancing immune function. More specifically, vitamin D suppresses inflammatory response, and better helps the body prevent viruses and infections in the sinuses. Studies have also shown people with chronic sinusitis have lower levels of vitamin D. About 10 to 15 minutes of direct sun three to four times a week is enough to help the body produce sufficient vitamin D. If you live in the northern United States, have darker skin, are over 70, or spend very little time in the sun, consider a vitamin D3 supplement.

10. Use a natural sinus spray
Commonly used as a natural, lower-calorie sugar substitute, xylitol is a sugar alcohol found in many fruits and vegetables including berries, plums, lettuce, and mushrooms. But there’s more to this sweet ingredient—xylitol’s unique molecular structure enables it to effectively stop bacteria in their tracks. Here’s how: bacteria and yeast like to “eat” xylitol as they would sugar, but unlike sugar, they can’t digest it—therefore, the bacteria essentially starve to death and do not reproduce. Research demonstrates that when used in nasal sprays, xylitol reduces bacteria in sinuses. Additionally, it works via osmosis to pull fluid into airways and helps moisturize and thin mucus.

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HEALTH

Home Remedies For Gray Hair That Really Work

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Home Remedies For Gray Hair That Really Work

1. Henna
Henna is a beautiful auburn dye prepared from the Lawsonia inermis tree which has been used for cosmetic purposes since ancient times.

Most henna comes in powder form and can be mixed with a variety of other natural substances such as lemon juice, vinegar, and cloves or fragrant oils before it is applied to hair. Henna can also be mixed with indigo for a darker color if desired.

Henna should be used regularly to maintain its brilliant color and to effectively mask the gray – anywhere from once per week to once a month depending on the depth of color desired.

2. Tea
Another method for covering gray hair and restoring your natural hair color is to use tea. Black teas work best for darker hues, chamomile for blondes, and rooibos for redheads.

Once a week, steep 3 to 5 teabags in two cups of boiling water and allow it to cool before applying it to your clean, wetted hair. For easier application, try mixing it with conditioner. Leave it in for a least one hour, and bear in mind that the longer it’s in your hair, the more intense the color will be. When your gray hair has absorbed the color of the tea, the mixture can be rinsed out.

Make sure to rinse your hair in cool water. Hot water will leach color from hair faster than colder water.

3. Coffee
For black or brown tresses, or to add some tonal variation to dark hair, just brew up a pot of strong coffee. Once cooled, mix one cup of the brew with two cups of hair conditioner. Throw in a few spoonfuls of spent coffee grounds into the mixture for added effect.

Leave it in your hair for a least one hour before rinsing. Though the coffee dye may be subtle, you can repeat these steps to achieve your desired color.

4. Herbs
Flowers and herbs make wonderful natural dyes. Because they are so gentle, you will likely need to use them regularly to maintain the color. There are many herbal options depending on your natural hair color:

Dark Hair – Rosemary, sage, nettle, cloves, cinnamon, black walnut hulls, and comfrey root
Blonde Hair – Chamomile, calendula, lemon peel, saffron, marigold, yarrow, sunflower petals, and mullein flowers
Red Hair – Hibiscus flowers, red clover, rosehips, red rose petals, beets, carrots, and marigold
When using fresh plants, be sure to dry them out completely and crush them into a fine powder. Feel free to mix and match different herbs to add more dimension to your color. Mix together ½ cup of dried herbs with water and simmer on the stove for 30 minutes. Allow it to cool before adding one tablespoon of a carrier oil like coconut oil. Apply to hair and let it sit for one to two hours before rinsing.

5. Amla the Indian Gooseberry
Phyllanthus emblica, commonly called Amla or Indian Gooseberry can be mixed with natural coconut oil or almond oil and massaged into the scalp to cover gray hair. Not only does this mixture act as a colorant, the oils will moisturize and enrich scalp and hair for a glossy healthier appearance all around. Amla juice can also be enjoyed as a beverage to improve overall health and slow or halt the growth of stubborn gray hair.

6. Beet, Carrot, and Lemon Juice
Juicing your hair with beet juice, carrot juice, lemon juice, or a combination of the three, will restore reddish hues or add some vibrant highlights to your existing color. Beets are better for darker reds, carrots for softer orange, and lemon for golden blonde.

Combine one cup of juice with hair conditioner or coconut oil and massage into hair. Since beet and carrot juice will color your skin too, be sure to protect your face by applying oil around your hairline, ears, and neck. Leave it in for an hour before rinsing. For lemon juice applications, sit out in the sun for extra lightening.

7. Potato Skins
The next time you peel your potatoes, save the skins to make a natural, hair-darkening dye. The starches in the potato peel act as a colorant that will slowly darken gray hair.

Boil two cups of water with one cup of potato skins for at least 25 minutes, strain out the peels and let the potato water cool down. It won’t smell very nice, so you may want to add a few drops of essential oil to the mix.

Shampoo and condition your hair as normal, parting your hair into several sections. You can pour the liquid directly on the hair sections or use a small hair dyeing brush to saturate each section. Rinse hair with cool water and repeat the process regularly until you get the desired look.

8. Catalase
A potent anti-oxidant found in the cells of all plants and animals living in an oxygen-rich environment, catalase is now known to help halt the growth of gray hair.

Hydrogen peroxide, a naturally occurring waste by-product of the metabolic process, is thought to be a major contributor in the breakdown of pigments in hair. As we age, our bodies produce less catalase, resulting in the build-up of hydrogen peroxide in our hair follicles – which literally bleaches hair follicles from the inside out.

By eating foods high in catalase such as garlic, onions, cauliflower, potatoes, broccoli, kale, and cabbage, we introduce this gray hair-fighting enzyme back into our bodies, resulting in the gradual return of our youthful hair pigmentation through a safe, all-natural process.

9. Copper
Another key to the mystery of why hair goes gray, a study published in 2012 revealed that low levels of copper in the body can lead to the premature graying of hair. Measuring the copper, zinc, and iron levels in the blood of 66 people under the age of 20 who were going gray, researchers found that their copper concentrations were significantly lower than those in the same age group who weren’t going gray.

Preventing gray hair could be as simple as eating more sesame seeds, cashews, soybeans, shiitake mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus – all of which are excellent dietary sources of copper.

10. Vitamin B12
Playing a key role in the healthy functioning of the brain and nervous system, vitamin B12 also helps produce DNA and RNA – the genetic code needed for the growth and development of all living beings.

Though a vitamin B12 deficiency has been linked to graying hair, it’s easily reversed by including salmon, sardines, tuna, lamb, beef, eggs, milk and other vitamin B12 foods into your diet. Or, boost B12 in the body by taking a supplement – such as this Nature Made Vitamin B12 supplement.

Silver hair
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HEALTH

Foods and drinks that you should eat for a fatty liver

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Foods and drinks that you should eat for a fatty liver

Here are a few foods to include in your healthy liver diet:
1. Coffee to lower abnormal liver enzymes
Studies have shown that coffee drinkers with fatty liver disease have less liver damage than those who don’t drink this caffeinated beverage. Caffeine appears to lower the amount of abnormal liver enzymes of people at risk for liver diseases.

2. Greens to prevent fat buildup
Broccoli is shown to help prevent the buildup of fat in the liver in mice. Eating more greens, like spinach, Brussels sprouts, and kale, can also help with general weight loss. Try the Canadian Liver Foundation’s recipe for vegetarian chili, which lets you cut back on calories without sacrificing flavor.

3. Tofu to reduce fat buildup
A University of Illinois study on rats found that soy protein, which is contained in foods like tofu, may reduce fat buildup in the liver. Plus, tofu is low in fat and high in protein.

4. Fish for inflammation and fat levels
Fatty fish such as salmon, sardines, tuna, and trout are high in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids can help improve liver fat levels and bring down inflammation. Try this teriyaki halibut recipe, recommended by the Canadian Liver Foundation, that’s especially low in fat.

5. Oatmeal for energy
Carbohydrates from whole grains like oatmeal give your body energy. Their fiber content also fills you up, which can help you maintain your weight.

6. Walnuts to improve the liver
These nuts are high in omega-3 fatty acids. Research finds that people with fatty liver disease who eat walnuts have improved liver function tests.

7. Avocado to help protect the liver
Avocados are high in healthy fats, and research suggests they contain chemicals that might slow liver damage. They’re also rich in fiber, which can help with weight control. Try this refreshing avocado and mushroom salad from Fatty Liver Diet Review.

8. Milk and other low-fat dairy to protect from damage
Dairy is high in whey protein, which may protect the liver from further damage, according to a 2011 study in rats.

9. Sunflower seeds for antioxidants
These nutty-tasting seeds are high in vitamin E, an antioxidant that may protect the liver from further damage.

10. Olive oil for weight control
This healthy oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids. It’s healthier for cooking than margarine, butter, or shortening. Research finds that olive oil helps to lower liver enzyme levels and control weight. Try this liver-friendly take on a traditional Mexican dish from LiverSupport.com.

11. Garlic to help reduce body weight
This herb not only adds flavor to food, but experimental studies also show that garlic powder supplements may help reduce body weight and fat in people with fatty liver disease.

12. Green tea for less fat absorption
Data supports that green tea can help interfere with fat absorption, but the results aren’t conclusive yet. Researchers are studying whether green tea can reduce fat storage in the liver and improve liver function. But green tea also has many benefits, from lowering cholesterol to aiding with sleep.

Coffee
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HEALTH

10 ways of Finding calm in the chaos !

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10 ways of Finding calm in the chaos !

EDITOR’S COMMENTS

Found this very good Blogg tonight

Really spectacular

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