Melbourne – Australia

Young and Jacksons Hotel was one of the first, if not the first, hotel in Melbourne to sell Foster Brothers lager beer. The building, dating back to 1853, was first opened as the Princes Bridge Hotel in 1861 by John P Toohey, the licence being subsequently transferred to James Hogan in 1862, Joshua Mooney in 1866, and Thomas Jackson and Henry Young jointly in 1875. The building had been built on Crown Land purchased by Launceston pastoralist John Batman for £100 in 1837 two years after he had, arguably, been the first European to settle what was then the Port Phillip District of New South Wales. By 1853 a three-storey bluestone building had been constructed on the site, occupied on the ground floor by butcher James Graham. On 1 July 1861 John P. Toohey opened the Princes Bridge Hotel.

Young and Jacksons became famous, or infamous, depending on your point of view, in 1908 for publicly displaying the highly controversial 1875 nude oil painting “Chloe” by acclaimed French artist Jules Joseph Lefebvre in the hotel’s saloon bar. “Chloe” made her debut at the 1875 Paris Salon Exhibition where she won gold, and was shipped to Melbourne for the 1880-1881 International Exhibition, again claiming the highest award, and being then purchased by Henry Young. ‘Chloe” hangs proudly today in Chloe’s Bar at Young and Jacksons on the corner of Swanston and Flinders Streets, Melbourne. Unlike “Chloe”, Lefebvre’s 19 year old Persian model for the painting did not stand the test of time. Two years after sitting for “Chloe” model Marie, after throwing a party for friends, took her life by drinking a boiled soup of poisonous matches.

The first photograph is of Mooney’s Princes Bridge Hotel, so would have been taken between 1866 and 1875 when Joshua Mooney was licensee.

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