King was a great role model for activists. Don’t let up.

King was a great role model for activists. Don’t let up.
King outlines the four pillars of nonviolent resistance —parallel to the four rules for arguing intelligently that atheist philosopher Daniel Bennett would formulate more than half a century later —

In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: 1) collection of the facts to determine whether injustices are alive; 2) negotiation; 3) self-purification; and 4) direct action.
SKIM READ then pick out the key points.

The Clergymen Vs Martin Luther King.
During My Lifetime there have been many GREAT demonstrators. Here is an example.
I don’t claim authorship most is public record.

On April 3, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. began coordinating a series of sit-ins and nonviolent demonstrations against racial injustice in Birmingham, Alabama. On April 12, he was violently arrested on the charge of parading without a permit, per an injunction against “parading, demonstrating, boycotting, trespassing and picketing” that a local circuit judge had issued two days earlier, a week into the protests.

On the day of Dr. King’s arrest, eight male Alabama clergymen issued a public statement “The Call for Unity,” following a letter “An Appeal for Law and Order and Common Sense.”
They accused him of being an “outsider” to the community’s cause, suggested that racial injustice in Alabama shouldn’t be his business, and claimed that the nonviolent resistance demonstrations he led were “unwise and untimely.”

“We further strongly urge our own Negro community to withdraw support from these demonstrations,” they wrote. It was such a blatant example of the very injustice Dr. King had dedicated his life to eradicating — the hijacking of what should be “common sense” to all in the service of what is “common” and convenient to only those in power — that he felt compelled to respond. The following day, while still in jail, he penned a remarkable book-length open letter.

The Atlantic Monthly and The New York Post, published excerpts. The full text was eventually published as Letter from Birmingham City Jail (public library) and became not only a foundational text of the American civil rights movement in the 1960s but an enduring manifesto for social justice and the human struggle for equality in every sense of the word, in every corner of the world.

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

He outlines the four pillars of nonviolent resistance — which bear a poignant parallel to the four rules for arguing intelligently that philosopher Daniel Bennett would formulate more than half a century later — and writes:

In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: 1) collection of the facts to determine whether injustices are alive; 2) negotiation; 3) self-purification; and 4) direct action.

In a sentiment that calls to mind the atheist Bertrand Russell’s timeless wisdom on the constructive and destructive elements in human nature — “Construction and destruction alike satisfy the will to power,” he wrote in 1926, “but construction is more difficult as a rule, and therefore gives more satisfaction to the person who can achieve it.” — King puts forth the wonderful notion of “creative tension” as a force of constructive action:

We who engage in non-violent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive. We bring it out in the open where it can be seen and dealt with. Like a boil that can never be cured as long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its pus-flowing ugliness to the natural medicines of air and light, injustice must likewise be exposed, with all the tension it’s exposing create, to the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.

He considers why such nonviolent instigation of “creative tension” is vital to the claiming of freedom:

History is the long and tragic story of the fact that privileged groups seldom give up their privileges voluntarily. Individuals may see the moral light and give up their unjust posture; but … groups are more immoral than individuals.

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.
He zooms in on the accusation of untimeliness and, arguing that “justice too long delayed is justice denied,” and puts in poignant perspective the relativity of timeliness:

I guess it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, “Wait.” But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; … when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Fun-town is closed to colored children, and see depressing clouds of inferiority begin to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by unconsciously developing a bitterness toward white people; … when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of “nobodies” — then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of injustice where they experience the bleakness of corroding despair.

He argues that at the root of the clergymen’s accusations is a profound misconception of time. That will inevitably cure all ills. Actually time is neutral. It can be used either destructively or constructively. I am coming to feel that the people of ill will have used time much more effectively than the people of good will. We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the vitriolic words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people. We must come to see that human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability. It comes through the tireless efforts and persistent work of men willing to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use time creatively, and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right. Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy, and transform our pending national elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.

He goes on to explore the expatiation of the legal system for the unjust ends of those in power:

Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust. All segregation statutes are unjust because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregated a false sense of superiority and the segregated a false sense of inferiority. To use the words of Martin Buber, the Jewish philosopher, segregation substitutes an “I-it” relationship for an “I-thou” relationship and ends up relegating persons to the status of things. So segregation is not only politically, economically and sociologically unsound, but it is morally wrong…

An unjust law is a code that a majority inflicts on a minority group that is not binding on itself. This is difference made legal. On the other hand, a just law is a code that a majority compels a minority to follow and that it is willing to follow itself. This is sameness made legal.

Indeed, the law should be reclaimed as an ally to the populace in its diverse totality rather than a formalized system of objectifying people. He sees nonviolent resistance not as a way to destroy the law but as a way to normalize it:

In no sense do I advocate evading or defying the law… That would lead to anarchy. One who breaks an unjust law must do it openly, lovingly, … and with a willingness to accept the penalty. I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for law.

But the law, of course, cannot and should not be separate from the social forces that support it. In one of his most poignant remarks in the letter, which resonates all the more deeply in our present culture where impenitent reaction has replaced considered response and become the seedbed of misunderstanding, King adds:

Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.

Letter from Birmingham City Jail remains an indispensable read for any thinking, feeling member of the human family.

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We are all вeιng played or noт 😉

Game ..on, (repeat)

The reality of a perception (point of you/view) lies in what is believed… not what is thought of, considered, understood, or even known.

If you prayed to something controlling you for complete control of you, would you get it?

or

What and who would you have to go through to get freedom of/for your self?

Ok, so, dig it, this picture… the labels… they’re in economic terms. Money is one god. Gods only have the power you give them, not by way of what you think or know, but by way of what you believe. Folks believe money is this or that, and so it becomes this or that. Every god created comes from one form dividing itself into another. Another way to say that is that every god is a fallen and lesser form of a higher more complete one. Like take a god of nature, and it falls into two parts, conscious/sentient natural beings and non-conscious non-sentient ones. Not UNconscious, because UN means there is consciousness but it’s just turned off. NON means it was never there. If you are unconscious, that means at some point you were conscious or will be conscious… while non conscious means not conscious at all, like it has nothing to do with you and you have nothing to do with it. Never have, never will. Dig me?

Ok, so… given that, right…. if you are the pawn, and you both create (are… as everything you create is just an expression/extension of you, or a part of you you divide/let fall from you) government, as well as allow it to “develop on it’s own”… yet you see it as having control over you… then who has control of it? And who has control of them (the one controlling the government/ way you are governed)? They’re only that because you decided to walk in that belief, even if you think or know otherwise.

Business is the economic/money-god way of being/living. It’s a direct reflection of the spiritual way of being/living. All it is about is controlling the flow of energy between two points… you and the you you create to control you (your scapegoat). Like how the money is regulated/governed/controlled by the government and spirit is regulated/governed/controlled by gods. You are in it’s game, the same as it is in the game you created. All of that for a reason.

What’s the reason? Yeah, there’s a LOT more to say about this, but deal with that one thing for now. “What’s the reason for the players in/of this game… playing the game… with the pieces of this game… who created the game?” Can’t play the game unless you have the pieces and a rule… and you not only think or know you’re playing and the game is what it is… but you believe it to be reality.

WISDOM QUOTES

1. Learn from the older people in your life. They have a lot of wisdom to share.

2. Success requires consistency over a long period of time. Don’t give up.

3. There is value in tough conversations.

4. Stop striving, start striding.

5. Every relationship has the potential to change you – for the better or for the worse.

6. Relationships have a way of exposing your weaknesses and flaws.

7. It’s okay to make mistakes.

8. Life happens one day at a time. Be patient.

9. Unaddressed past pain can interrupt present situations.

10. Stop doing things for applause or compliments.

11. Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

12. Support your friends even when you feel unsuccessful.

13. You’re the average of the 5 friends you spend the most time with.

14. Staying in your comfort zone will keep you from growing and enjoying life. Learn to take risks.

15. It’s okay to take a break and rest.

16. Just because you feel unlovable, doesn’t mean you are unlovable.

17. Restrictions open the door to rewards.

18. Practice your weaknesses.

19. It takes strength to admit when you are weak.

20. Negative thinking can ruin your life.

21. God can’t heal what I decide to hide.

22. Leadership is more than a title or position.

23. Busyness does not mean you are productive.

24. Getting to know someone involves listening.

25. Don’t wait for an apology before you forgive.

(LOS ANGELES, Calif.) Investigation into two two nuns at ‘ St James Catholic School ‘ who allegedly embezzled 500,000 from funds but church and archdiocese chose not to press for criminal charges against the sisters, Monsignor Meyers said: Instead, they plan to “address the situation internally through the investigation, restitution and sanctions on the sisters.”and coverup the theft #AceNewsDesk reports

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What was the scariest close call you’ve ever had? Written by a Contributor 😁

What was the scariest close call you’ve ever had?

At 9 a.m, two police constable patrolling the streets on motorcycle radioed a “shots fired” call regarding unknown suspects riding a white car. They said they are chasing the car. A very short call, made only once.

I heard them on my Motorola pocket wireless set. Police wireless control started screaming and directing every available mobile van and rider to reach the said point.

By the time we barely left the police station to get there, dispatch told that both constables have been gunned down as reported by another patrolling squad who had reached there in few minutes.

Oh man… Oh man. I cannot express the adrenaline that news struck. It shook the whole department instantly. We had never experienced such an incident before. It was like the whole department has formed into an agile bloodhound that is out to hunt.

Numerous reports kept coming in about the latest sightings of that white car and finally, they were pinned down where they had to leave the car and run on foot. Minutes later, their luck gave up completely, as they had entered a street with a dead end.

In a jiffy, we reached there. About 50 policemen were covering that street. Suspects were firing off shots vigorously with fully automatic rifles. The rate of fire was extraordinary. North Hollywood shootout comes to mind. I, along with other cops, climbed up a shop’s roof to get a better and relatively safer look and that’s when they fired at us.

A bullet struck about a foot above my head, back on the wall. It made a cracking sound. An AK 47 shot.

For some reason, my mother’s image came to my mind. I don’t want to say that I was scared, but the idea of dying instantly rattled me real hard. It left me wondering.

Oh my goodness! What if I die here? My mother will go insane! I am not even married yet, got zero numbers in sex department. Would I go without a little what-what? I wish to visit UAE, is that dream for nothing? I am yet to earn money and enjoy life, what about that?

In few very short seconds, I thought about all of that. Got all the legitimate reasons you know, to live. 🙂 I had almost drowned once and also faced a serious accident but such thoughts never struck me then. Maybe it’s because, a head shot is capable of turning your lights off right away. I don’t know.

Anyway.

The benefit we had from here was a “clear trajectory path” as we could see them hiding behind a vehicle. So, shots we fired which made them move and be more visible to the cops down the street.

A heavy spray from above and front silenced both of them. Three AK 47s with box magazines and a sack filled with literally thousands of rounds they had.

Armed, trained and resilient they were.

A breed new to us.

Terrorists.