Australian History

In the shadow of Terra Nullius: Part 1 invisibility to survival
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Sunday 17 June 2018 12:05PM
IMAGE: NOTICE OUTSIDE BAGOT ABORIGINAL RESERVE: “NOTICE – ABORIGINALS ORDINANCE 1918-1939, BAGOT ABORIGINAL RESERVE. ANY UNAUTHORISED PERSON WHO ENTERS OR REMAINS ON THIS RESERVE WILL BE PROSECUTED. DIRECTOR OF NATIVE AFFAIRS.”LINK TO LARGER IMAGE.
The story of the relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians is contested and complex. Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders are the first people and their land, way of life and culture was forever changed with the arrival of Europeans.

Over three Rear Vision traces the story of Australia’s relationship with its indigenous people — from the time of Federation in 1901 through to the Uluru Statement in 2017.

Supporting Information

In the shadow of Terra Nullius
Rear Vision traces the story of Australia’s relationship with its indigenous people — from the time of Federation in 1901 through to the Uluru Statement in 2017.

More

Read: Watershed moments in Indigenous Australia’s struggle to be heard
Wednesday 4 July 2018

From the arrival of the First Fleet to the trauma of the Stolen Generations, the fight for land rights and the Uluru Statement from the Heart, the story of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australia has often been one of marginalisation and struggle.

More

Transcript
Show
Guests
Pat Anderson
Chairperson of the Lowitja Institute
Bain Attwood
Professor of history at Monash University and author of Rights for Aborigines, Telling the Truth About Aboriginal History, and The Making of the Aborigines.
Henry Reynolds
ARC Senior Research Fellow, School of History & Classics University of Tasmania
Dr Tim Rowse
Senior Research Fellow,
History Program,
Research School of Social Sciences,
Australian National University
Heidi Norman
Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Technology, Sydney. Author of “What Do We Want?’: A Political History of Aboriginal Land Rights in New South Wales.
Mick Dodson
Professor at ANU and Yawuru man from Broome.
Professor Jakelin Troy
Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research
Department: Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)
University of Sydney
Marcia Langton
and author of Honour Among Nations?: Treaties And Agreements With Indigenous People and editor Settling with Indigenous People: Modern Treaty and Agreement-making.
Credits
PresenterAnnabelle Quince ProducerAnnabelle Quince
Comments (5)Add your comment
Vic Langsam :
17 Jun 2018 12:45:46pm

Rear Vision Annabel Quince
Sunday 12 noon June 17th 2018
Our First People – Assimilation
I DEMAND this wonderful presentation not only be mandatory for all schools in Australia but be edited and repeated every Australia Day.
Anything less will be subject to further requests from me
best regards
Vic Langsam

Reply Alert moderator

neil watson :
18 Jun 2018 4:16:28pm

Please provide examples where ‘terra nullius was ever claimed or invoked. Please list twenty Aboriginal children taken from their parents purely because they were ‘Aboriginal’.

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Susan Clark :
27 Jun 2018 12:59:38am

As a past child protection worker in Queensland there was most definitely a section of the child protection act that explicitly allowed for removal of a child from his / her parents “for being an Aboriginal”. This was aside from those sections that allowed for children to be removed because they were being abused, neglected, abandoned etc. And this section was still in place in the 1980s – we were instructed not to use it then, but it was still there. There is NO doubt in my mind that children were removed simply for being indigenous.

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Charles Leskun :
25 Jun 2018 4:57:45am

Prescient and very important.

We are in the process of revising and expanding the courses of study of History, Humanities and Canada and World Studies in Ontario to include in a more thoroughgoing, critical and engaging manner Indigenous/First Nations issues, traditions, society, culture and history.
The similarities are overwhelming but sadly not unique. I agree with your previous writer that every teacher should hear your moving and necessary presentation. I will forward your series to my colleagues, along with the work of Stan Grant, at our next conference.

Thank you.

Charles Leskun BA, MA, CCW, Bed.
Ontario History and Social Science Teachers Association (OHASSTA) VP,
Ontario History and Geography Consultants Association, Executive,
Subject Chair Canada and World Studies, DPCDSB (retired)
884 Anderson Ave. Milton, On.
C 905 334 5803
H 905 878 8598
leskunc@yahoo.com
leskunc@hdsb.ca

Reply Alert moderator

Eliza Tree :
05 Jul 2018 1:24:49am

This 3 part series is brilliant, and essential listening. Each part covers diverse and important topics about the Invasion of Australia beginning in 1770, to the present day.
Spoken with strong clear Indigenous Voice and perspectives.Us white fellas and all, have a lot more to learn, understand and acknowledge about these massive realities: the ‘Colonisation’ / Invasion of Aboriginal Australia.

Looking forward to further programs in this vital series.
Well done Annabelle Quince & Team.

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